Ag Scene 2016

AttachmentSize
AgScene_2016.pdf13.32 MB
Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player

A special supplement to The Renville County Shopper & The Glencoe Advertiser
MCPA offers energy
efficiency options
to farmers p.5
Farmer
switched
acreage to
strip tillage
p.9
Ag Plastic:
McLeod County may
become a hubp.13
www.GlencoeNews.com,
click on Special Sections
Go Online
to view this
section!
212 Seed & Ag:
A new company, years
of experience p.19
212 Seed & Ag, Inc. ................................9
4 Square Builders ..................................25
A+ Insurance Agency, Inc. ..................50
ADM Seedwest......................................50
Ag Specialists ..........................................6
AgStar - Chad Young ............................31
AgStar Financial Services ....................27
Alsleben Livestock Trucking ................23
Arnold’s Implement Inc.........................49
Auto Value Parts Stores ........................45
Bird Island-Hawk Creek
FarMutual Ins. Agency ......................9
Bergmann Interiors................................31
Bird Island Soil Service ........................35
Buckentin Seeds ....................................31
Carly’s Shoes ........................................25
Citizens Alliance Bank ..........................20
Conklin Service, Ken Franke ..................8
Co-op Country Farmers Elevator ........14
The Country Store ................................49
Creative Details ....................................44
Crop Production Services........................8
Dahlberg Boot & Trailer Sales ..............45
Dale’s Auto Sales ....................................6
Danube Lumber ....................................40
Dawson Co-op Credit Union ................44
Duane Jindra Crop Ins. Agency ............39
E.G. Rud & Sons, Inc. ..........................12
Enestvedt Seed Co.................................26
Ervin Well Company ............................47
Exsted Realty ........................................12
F & M Bank Minnesota ........................32
F & M Insurance....................................32
Fahey, Inc. ............................................24
Farmers Co-op Oil Co ..........................20
Farmers Mutual Hail Insurance Co. -
Keith L. Scott Agency ......................33
Finish Line Seed Inc. ............................20
First Minnesota Bank, Glencoe ............51
First Security Bank................................26
Flatworks Concrete Const., LLC ............3
Fleet Supply True Value ........................25
Flora Mutual Insurance Co. ..................33
Foamtastic Insulation, Inc. ....................35
Frandsen Bank & Trust..........................50
Fresh Look Painting ................................8
Fullerton Lumber - TBC........................48
Gavin, Winters, & Long, Ltd.................12
Glencoe Co-op Assn..............................48
Goetsch Insurance Agency ......................2
Grizzly Buildings, Inc. ..........................19
H & L Motors ........................................10
Harvest Land Cooperative ....................50
Haubrich Seeds......................................10
Hearing Care Specialists ........................4
Heldt Painting & Contracting, LLC........4
Heller Group Realty ..............................26
Henslin Auctions, Inc. ..........................27
HomeTown Bank ..................................43
Hughes Real Estate/Auction Service ....14
Hutchinson Co-op..................................22
Jackels & Ross Concrete Inc. ................37
JD’s Custom Baling ..............................24
Jerry Scharpe Ltd...................................15
K & M Manufacturing ..........................44
K & S Electric ......................................40
K & S Millwrights, Inc. ........................16
Kahnke Brothers Tree Farm..................37
KEI Kibble Equipment ..........................40
Ken’s Excavating ....................................8
Klein Bank ..............................................8
Lake Region Insurance Agency ............40
Larkin Tree Care & Lndsg Inc. ............40
Liberty Tax Service ..............................15
Lindeman Seeds ....................................42
Linder Farm Network............................36
Mac’s Hrdware ......................................18
Mallak Trucking Inc. ............................20
Marcus Well Drilling ............................45
McLeod Publishing, Inc. ..........23, 24, 46
Mid-County Co-op ................................42
MidCountry Bank..................................52
Midwest Machinery Co. ........................22
Mid-State Painting ................................40
Miller Manufacturing Co.......................42
Minnesota Corn & Soybean Growers ..29
MinnWest Bank ....................................14
Morris Builders......................................38
Mycogen Seeds......................................43
NAPA Auto & Truck Parts ....................13
Nelson’s Salvage & Towing, Inc. ..........35
Northern Plumbing & Heating, Inc. ......14
Northland Buildings, Inc. ......................24
Olivia Chrysler Center ..........................41
Olivia Machine Shop Inc.......................10
Olivia Pet Clinic ....................................20
On Trax Truck Repair............................37
Otto Farms Operations Inc. ..................48
Pine Country Bank ................................45
Precision Planting - Chad Schmalz ......15
Pro Auto ................................................27
Pro Equipment Sales ............................45
Professional Insurance Providers ..........25
RCR Organic Feed Store ......................23
Red Power Repair, LLC........................35
Renville County Register ................19, 46
Renville Sales, Inc. ................................30
Rickert Excavating ................................37
Rockhard Concrete & Masonry ..............6
Saunders Mertens Schmitz, P.A. ..........33
Schauer & Sons Construction................31
Schauer’s Custom Log Sawing ............31
Schauer’s Sheep ....................................25
Schwarzrock Motors..............................24
Security Bank & Trust Co. ......................4
Seneca Foods Corp. ................................8
SLS Certified Public Accountants ........12
State Farm Insurance ..............................4
Steve’s Heating & AC ..........................40
Stewart Rollers ........................................3
Sullivan’s Electric..................................41
Terry’s Body Shop ................................20
Thalmann Seeds ....................................37
Thurston Genetics..................................20
Tjosvold Equipment, Inc. ......................43
Two-Way Communications ..................27
United FCS............................................47
United Farmers Coop............................6, 8
Upper Midwest Management ................41
Valley Electric of Olivia Inc. ................26
Willmar Aerial Spraying Inc. ................34
Wise Furniture Co. ................................34
Young America Mutual Ins. Co. ..............6
AG SCENE - 2 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
Index
NEWS INDEX
Vincent talks environmental movement at Growers banquet ....................p. 3
MCPA offers energy efficiency options to farmers ........................................p. 5
Variable speed drives cut dairy electricity use ................................................p. 5
Help for chapped skin turns into business for Beckers ................................p. 7
Farmer switched acreage to strip tillage in 2015 ......................................p. 9-10
Two drainage projects slated in Glencoe area ..............................................p. 11
Ag plastic: McLeod County may become a hub......................................p. 13, 15
Finally, victory for the raisin farmers ..............................................................p. 15
Leedstone: A quiet, but important presence in Glencoe............................p. 17
212 Seed and Ag: A new company, years of experience ......................p. 19-20
BCWD deals with hot topic — water ............................................................p. 21
GMOs or no GMOs ............................................................................................p. 22
Farmers are true conservationists....................................................................p. 23
MFU states key issues for legislative session..................................................p. 27
Slow-cooked whiskey-molasses shredded beef ............................................p. 27
Strong U.S. dollar makes U.S. grains a tough sell ..................................p. 33, 35
The benefits of beef in the human diet............................................................p. 39
John Baize sees lots of challenges around world ............................p. 41, 43, 45
Higher populations not answer to higher yields ..........................................p. 47
Good residue management starts at back of combine ................................p. 49
Thank you to all of our advertisers for contributing to the 2016 Ag Scene supplement.
Thank you to the writers and interviewees, for the editorial content.
Published by
McLeod Publishing, Inc., 716 E. 10th St., Glencoe, MN 55336 • 320-864-5518.
& Renco Publishing, Inc., 110 NW Dupont Ave., Renville, MN 56284
Printed by
House of Print, 322 Benzel Ave. SW, Madelia, MN 56062 • 888-741-4467
For life’s unexpected storms, Auto-Owners Insurance
and your local independent agent will be there when
you need us most - just like we have been for 100 years.
L I F E HOME CAR BUSI NESS
Goetsch Insurance Agency
Brad Goetsch & Ashley Messner
315 4
th
St., Gaylord
507-237-4215 or 1-888-550-4175
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 3 - AG SCENE
By Rebecca Mariscal
Staff Writer
T
he line between environmental
sensitivity and environmental
sanity is a thin one, and it’s one
often crossed, Bruce Vincent said at the
McLeod County Corn and Soybean
Growers Banquet.
Vincent, a third-generation logger and
motivational speaker, spoke to the associa-
tion during its annual meeting and dinner
Saturday night, Jan. 30
The environmental movement, Vincent
explained, started in the 1960s with good
and well-intending groups who realized
that humans only had one planet and peo-
ple needed to take care of it. The move-
ment, however, has not matured with
time and the laws no longer resemble
what they’re supposed to be.
“The movement and laws are showing
their age,” Vincent said.
A new collision of visions is occurring,
with urban residents discovering the rural
areas that represent what they thought
were gone. In an effort to save these envi-
ronments, Vincent said the urban people
are imprinting their vision on the rural
area, and it’s wrong.
“They don’t know what makes this
work,” he said. “They’re saving rural
America to death.”
Vincent has experienced this first hand,
when a court case on behalf of grizzly
bears, and threatened court cases on sev-
eral other endangered species, shut down
logging in his area and closed his business.
“We think there’s got to be a better
way,” Vincent said.
For many organizations, Vincent said
the environmental movement and corre-
sponding laws have become more about
money than environmental stewardship
thanks to the Equal Access to Justice Act,
which will pay the legal fees of a party in
action against the United States.
Vincent said these organizations pro-
vide misinformation through the media
that is consumed by an ignorant and mis-
understanding public.
“They have 50 years of Bambi under
their belt,” he said.
Vincent said it is important to under-
stand that ecology and economy come
from the same route. They are the inside
and outside of the same house, something
many do not see.
“We love to consume, it’s just produc-
tion that sucks,” Vincent explained.
Though Vincent said it is easy for those
in the rural area to joke about the lack of
knowledge others have, it is not laughable.
“They are intelligent people trying to
make difficult decision on bad informa-
tion,” he said.
Americans are ready to hear from rural
ideas, ready to hear that there’s a reason
to have hope for the environment.
“That’s our door,” he said. “We have to
become activists.”
The new environmental movement,
Vincent said, will be led by rural people.
It will be run by those who are close to the
ground.
“There is a way to save the last great
places but it will take the last great people
standing together to do it,” he said.
*****
In addition to the annual business meet-
ing, the McLeod County Corn and Soy-
bean Growers Association also presented
the “Friend of Agriculture” award to
KGLB 1310 General Manager Jeremy
Stender.
Vincent talks environmental movement at Growers banquet
Bruce Vincent spoke to guests at the McLeod County Corn and Soybean Growers
Banquet. Vincent spoke about the importance of keeping the environmental movement
on course.
KGLB 1310 General Manager Jeremy Stender, left, received the “Friend of Agriculture”
award from the McLeod Corn & Soybean Growers Association. At the right is Brian
Thalmann of the association.
James Rosckes, Glencoe
• Commercial
• Residential
• Agricultural
Call us for all your
agricultural needs!
Office: (320) 864-5729
Cell: (612) 310-5729
james@flatworksconcrete.com
www.flatworksconcrete.com
Rent the latest in roller technology Rent the latest in roller technology Rent the latest in roller technology
• Special design for rolling after planting peas, alfalfa and small grain
(manage crusting).
• Effective in erosion control and drifting on heavy trash seadbeds.
Rent for
$
3
75
/ac. • 50 footers • Five 45 ft. Summer’s rollers
Arlen Aas • 320-583-4110
See us at www.stewartrollers.com
AG SCENE - 4 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
Come see us
for all your
Insurance
and Financial
needs.
HELDT PAINTING
AND CONTRACTING
PO Box 458, Lester Prairie, MN 55354
Call Earl at (320) 395-2761, (320) 282-8951
or Jared at (320) 282-8952
PAINTING & CONTRACTING
º CnmmcrcIa! and RcsIdcntIa!
º
TcxturIng nI CcI!Ings and Wa!!s
Frcc EstImatcs
°38 Ycars ExpcrIcncc"
SECURITY BANK & TRUST CO.
www. Securi ty-Banks. com
Banking
.
Investments
.
Mortgage
.
Trust
See us today at any of our 12 locations to serve you
CALL TODAY 320-864-5262
OR TOLL FREE 1-888-931-9144
TRUST YOUR HEARING TO A
DOCTOR OF AUDIOLOGY
Kurt T. Pfaff, Au.D.
DOCTOR OF AUDIOLOGY
MINNESOTA LICENSED AUDIOLOGIST
www.hcshearing.com
Dr. Pfaff understands hearing loss. Let him prescribe a truly
personalized hearing solution for you. Hear the difference!
Dr. Pfaff has been the Audiologist of choice in the
Glencoe/Hutchinson area for the past 24 years.
New patients Always Welcome!
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 5 - AG SCENE
McLeod Cooperative Power Associa-
tion (MCPA), a provider of electricity to
homes and businesses in McLeod,
Renville, Sibley, and Carver counties, is
rolling out a suite of services and efficient
equipment grants for farming patrons to
reduce their energy use.
“Energy efficient farming equipment
can really help producers decrease energy
costs and improve operations,” said Shan-
non Jerabek, energy management special-
ist for McLeod Cooperative Power Associ-
ation.
Through a project funded by the Min-
nesota Department of Commerce, MCPA
partnered with the Clean Energy Re-
source Teams (CERTs) to survey over
2,500 MCPA farming patrons to better
understand general energy use on the
farm. A second, farm-specific survey
helped identify the age and type of tech-
nologies the farms are using.
Based on the responses from farming
patrons, MCPA, CERTs, and technology
consultant GDS Associates identified sev-
eral technologies many farms could use to
reduce energy costs. These include milk
plate coolers, refrigeration heat recovery
units, variable speed drives, scroll-type re-
frigeration compressors, and low-energy
livestock waterers. Other technologies are
available for hog and poultry producers
on a custom grant basis. Technologies
that save energy will receive a MCPA
grant while funding lasts.
McLeod Cooperative Power Associa-
tion is also providing farm energy assess-
ments to help farmers understand which
energy saving technology is best for their
operation. A farm energy assessment in-
cludes a walk-through of the farm to take
inventory of equipment and estimate kilo-
watt-hour consumption. MCPA energy
management specialists also speak with
the farmer to understand energy use be-
havior patterns and determine the best ac-
tion.
“Finding the most bang for your energy
buck takes some analysis. We’re here to
help you crunch the numbers,” added Jer-
abek.
For farms and residents interested in
changing out their incandescent light
bulbs or replacing their yard lights,
MCPA encourages patrons to buy already
discounted LED lights from their online
store. Notably, nearly two-thirds of
MCPA farming patrons who responded
still employ Edison-style incandescent
bulbs and many use metal halide or mer-
cury vapor lights, even though efficient
LED bulbs are readily available with the
right light output and color. For more in-
formation and pricing, check out MCPA’s
online LED store.
This Conservation, Applied Research &
Development (CARD) project is funded
through the Minnesota Department of
Commerce, Division of Energy Re-
sources. It serves to develop a replicable
curriculum for other rural electric cooper-
atives to use when working with farming
constituents to save energy and avoid
building costly new power generation fa-
cilities.
If you are interested in farm energy
services, contact McLeod Cooperative
Power Association directly at 1-800-494-
6272.
*****
About MCPA: Established in 1935,
McLeod Cooperative Power is a member-
owned cooperative that provides electrici-
ty to more than 6,000 residents, business-
es, and industries in central Minnesota,
primarily in McLeod, Renville, Sibley and
Carver counties. McLeod also provides
Exede broadband Internet and other serv-
ices to 5,000 homes in its service area.
About CERTs: The Clean Energy Re-
source Teams—or CERTs—are a
statewide partnership with a shared mis-
sion to connect individuals and their com-
munities to the resources they need to
identify and implement community-based
clean energy projects. CERTs is a part-
nership of the University of Minnesota
Extension Regional Sustainable Develop-
ment Partnerships, Great Plains Institute,
Southwest Regional Development Com-
mission, and the Minnesota Department
of Commerce, Division of Energy Re-
sources.
Why should I install a variable speed
drive (VSD) on my milk pump?
- Milk will cool faster due to a constant
flow rate through the plate cooler.
- Faster milk cooling inhibits growth of
bacteria, preserving milk quality and fla-
vor.
- Lower bacteria counts often deliver
higher milk premiums.
- Shorter compressor run times mean
lower electric bills.
- Integrated phase converter variable
speed drives are available for single phase
applications.
Value of milk pre-cooling
The speed of milk flow to the bulk tank
is an important consideration in the milk
cooling system design. Milk pre-cooling is
widely used to maintain milk quality by
cooling the milk quickly, reducing bulk
tank compressor run time, and saving on
electricity costs.
Plate-type milk pre-coolers utilize cold
water in a heat exchanger to absorb heat
from the warm milk before it goes to the
bulk tank. The efficiency of the plate cool-
er depends on the temperature of the cold
water, the ratio of cold water to warm
milk flowing through the unit, and the
rate of flow of the milk. Plate coolers are
sized to accommodate the volume of milk
being pumped to the bulk tank.
How does a milk pump variable speed
drive work?
Another factor in plate cooler efficiency
is the evenness of the flow of milk through
the unit. With standard milk pumps the
milk can gush or trickle into the plate
cooler, reducing heat exchange efficiency.
A variable speed drive (VSD) produces
a steady flow of milk through the plate
cooler and optimizes cooling. This im-
proved performance reduces cooling costs
in the bulk tank and helps maintain milk
quality.
The milk pump VSD can reduce the
temperature of the milk entering the bulk
tank to within 4° F of the incoming cold
water temperature.
Significant savings
Typical energy savings of 30% can be
realized by reducing the run time of the
bulk tank compressor when a plate cooler
is used in conjunction with a milk pump
VSD.
VSD operation
Milking vacuum pumps are sized to de-
liver the required maximum vacuum level
to operate the milking and washing sys-
tems.
Occasionally, when a milking unit falls
off a cow’s udder or when there is a tem-
porary system leak, high levels of vacuum
are needed for short intervals. Normal
milking operation uses less than half the
maximum vacuum available.
Before variable speed technology was
used for vacuum pumps, dairy operators
had to run their pumps at a constant high
speed to perform adequately during the
occasional short intervals of high vacuum
need.
The VSD determines exactly how much
vacuum the system requires and regulates
the speed of the pump. The result is a
pump that runs at a much lower speed
most of the time and requires substantially
less electricity to do the job.
Stable vacuum
A constant vacuum level at the milking
units is necessary to prevent bacteria from
accessing the cows’ teats. A VSD reacts
quickly and maintains a stable level as well
or better than conventional systems.
Equipment life
A motor run at full speed will have a
shorter life span than a motor that regu-
larly runs at a lower speed. Since the VSD
operates the vacuum pump at reduced
RPMs, bearings and other internal com-
ponents last longer and require less fre-
quent maintenance. Pumps will require
less frequent replacement.
Noise reduction
Conventional milking vacuum pumps
running at full speed make a lot of noise.
Many farmers benefit from significantly
quieter milking areas.
Great financial investment
The energy and money savings from in-
stalling a VSD varies from farm to farm,
based on the size and type of vacuum
pump, the type of milking system, and the
milking time. On some dairy farms, the
substantial energy savings have made the
payback period on the installed cost of the
VSD as short as three years. Quick pay-
back makes the VSD one of the best in-
vestments a dairy farmer can make.
-Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy
MCPA offers energy efficiency options to farmers
Variable speed drives cut dairy electricity use
Milk pump system with a
variable speed drive controller
What does a variable
speed drive do?
The Variable Speed Drive is a digital
controller that regulates the speed of
the milking vacuum pump.
Integrated phase converter variable
speed drives are available for single
phase applications.
AG SCENE - 6 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
FREE Lay-a-Way
CARS, PICK-UPS, SUV’S & VANS
Over 150
$
2,995 -
$
8,995
FREE WARRANTIES
On Most 1996’s & Newer
www.DalesAutoSalesMN.com
DALE’S AUTO SALES
20641 Hwy. 7 W., Hutchinson • 320-587-2663
(1 mile West of Super America) Open 9 am–8 pm; Sat. 9 am-5 pm
Dale Harbarth Mark Harbarth
Hutchinson, Dmc Grain Equipment, Lowry, Meridian,
NECO, Spread-All & AP Bulk Bins
Arlington • Gaylord • Lafayette • Klossner • Norseland • LeSueur • Winthrop
Sales, Service & Parts For-
• GSI & Brock Grain Bins
• Sudenga & Westfield Augers
• Farm Fans, GSI & Kansun
Grain Dryers
• Sudenga, GSI, Sukup & Schlagel
Grain Handling Equipment
Give Us
A Call
Today!
Make It United Farmers Coop.
For All Your Grain Handling Needs
Ag Service Center:
840 Pioneer Ave.
Lafayette, MN
800-642-4104
507-228-8224
800-642-4104 or
507-228-8224
www.ufcmn.com
Main Office/
Ag Service Center
840 Pioneer Ave.,
Lafayette, MN
is your
area dealer
for H&S
Bobcat · GSI · Brock
Sudenga · Gehl
Farm Fans · Wilrich
You'II
fi nd it at...
Check with us on grain
bins, dryers, grain
handling equipment &
grain augers
UFC
United Farmers Cooperative
We have a manure spreader
to fit your operation!
MANURE SPREADERS
H&S design and engineering
guarantees longer equipment life!
Ag Specialists Can Handle
All Your Ag Production Needs
Ag Specialists
320-238-2188
Plato
Big Gain Feed
Rolling, Mixing, Feed Delivery
TMR Balancing & Formulating
Full-Service Grain Facility
Direct Ship Grain
Dekalb Seed/Asgrow Seed
Direct Seeding Alfalfa
Custom Application & Spraying
Liquid Fertilizer & Chemical Needs
BRT Liquid Floater
I Footings I Steps I Driveways I Floors
I Patios I Foundations I Repair I Tear Out
I Sidewalks I Basements I Exposed Aggregate
I Stamped & Colored Concrete
Free Estimates
Owner: Ross Horstmann • Silver Lake
320-327-2104 • Cell: 320-296-6061
Serving You for 147 Years!
Young America Mutual Insurance Co.
615 West 13th St., Glencoe, MN 55336‑1000
320‑864‑3069 ‑ Connie Jaskowiak, Manager
Hours: Mon.‑Thurs. 8 a.m.‑4 p.m.; Fri. 8 a.m.‑12:30 p.m.
Property Insurance for
Farm • Business • Home
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 7 - AG SCENE
By Rebecca Mariscal
Staff Writer
W
hat started as a way to heal
cracked hands has developed
into a family effort that heals
the whole of a family farm.
Fifteen-year-old Eddie Becker of Glen-
coe started the company Eddie’s Goat
Milk Goods back in February. The idea
came about when Eddie, who experienced
chapped hands in the winter, started look-
ing for a solution. After trying everything
in the store, he turned to his pet goats for
the answer.
Using the milk from his goats and play-
ing around with recipes, Eddie created a
lotion that worked not only for him, but
others as well.
“We gave it to family and friends and
they tried it and really liked it. And it
helped him,” Eddie’s mom Tracy said.
“So I was like, ‘Wow, this is awesome.’”
It didn’t take long for the product to ex-
pand beyond the Becker’s circle of friends.
Eddie and his family started selling the lo-
tion at farmers’ markets and passing out
cards to local businesses. Less than a year
later, Eddie’s products, the original lotion,
soap and milk baths, are now in several
stores in the area including the local
Health Nut Pantry in Glencoe.
“It’s a little bit exciting, but a little
nerve-racking,” Eddie said.
As the product becomes more popular,
Eddie himself has gotten more recogni-
tion. “Wow” is the response Eddie said he
gets most from people who meet the
young entrepreneur.
“There are lots of congratulations and
lots of people that wish him well,” Tracy
said.
With the growth of the company,
Eddie’s family has stepped in to support
him.
“It’s kind of developed into a family
business now that it’s gotten so big,”
Eddie said.
Each of Eddie’s siblings, Jack, Emma
and Sam, along with mother Tracy, help
out in every way they can. Jack helps with
making the lotions as well as the chores of
maintaining the fencing and pastures. Sis-
ter Emma helps with labeling and also
makes a goat milk fudge that is sold with
Eddie’s lotions. Sam helps with the chores
and “supervises.”
“These guys are all super helpful,”
Tracy said. “It really has just taken all of
us now.”
The Beckers have plenty of experience
working hard as a family. Up until 2009,
they owned a dairy farm in Alexandria.
“Just having the farming background
has definitely helped,” Tracy said. “It was
so important for them to have responsibil-
ity.”
After selling the farm and cows, the new
venture with goats and the business has
helped fill the place the farm once had.
“It’s really healing after everything
we’ve been through. I know on them that
was really hard to sell the house and walk
away from everything,” Tracy said.
The family working together once again
is a dream come true for them.
“Except for the dream is a little bit
smaller,” Eddie said, with goats instead of
cows.
Moving forward, Eddie hopes the busi-
ness will be able to bring one key family
member, dad Ed, back. Ed works at a
dairy farm about 15 miles away.
“The goal is that my dad could come
home and it’ll get big enough where it will
just support our family,” Eddie said.
Reflecting on the success Eddie has had
so far brings tears to Tracy’s eyes.
“I’m just so proud of them,” she said.
“That’s it.”
The company is still looking to expand
to a few more stores, and Eddie said he
plans on continuing with the business for
a long time.
Help for chapped skin turns into business for Beckers
It takes the effort of a whole family to run Eddie’s Goat Milk Goods. Pictured above are Jack, Emma, Eddie and Sam Becker who run
the business along with mom Tracy.
AG SCENE - 8 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
is your area
dealer for
Bobcat
Bobcat Skid-Steer Loaders...
Productivity has never been so comfortable!
800-642-4104 or
507-228-8224
www.ufcmn.com
Main Office/
Ag Service Center
840 Pioneer Ave.,
Lafayette, MN
Check With Us For Your New &
Used Grain Dryers & Augers
Bobcat · GSI · Brock · Sudenga
Gehl · Farm Fans · Wilrich
You'II
find it
at...
Check with us on grain
bins, dryers, grain handling
equipment & grain augers
UFC
United Farmers Cooperative
A World Leader in Agribusiness
Producing Top Quality Canned & Frozen
Peas & Sweet Corn
A Community Leader & Supporter in the
Glencoe Area for over 60 years!
Seneca Foods, started in 1949, has been dedicated to providing
quality food products and service excellence to our customers.
We began by concentrating on one product, concord grape
juice, and carved out a successful niche in a growing market.
Today, the breadth of our operations encompasses a vast array
of fruit and vegetable products. We are involved in multiple as-
pects of agribusiness, from growing crops to manufacturing
and marketing the packaged goods. And we remain commit-
ted to delivering high quality products that our customers can
trust and depend on.
Seneca Foods is an Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive
consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, or veteran status.
Seneca Foods Corporation
101 West 8th Street, Glencoe, MN 55336
320.864.3151
Main Human Resource 320.864.2316
Toll Free Human Resource 800.252.4875
Fresh Look Painting
“See the difference we make”
Interior & Exterior • Residential & Commercial
Decks • Pressure Washing • Metal Sheds & Barns
Ceiling Texture & Repair • Drywall & Repair
Wallpaper Removal • Staining & Varnishing
*30-foot boom truck*
Cell: 320-412-6749
320-234-7927
Fully
Insured
Free
Estimates
CONKLIN
®
AGROVANTAGE
®
PRODUCTS
Fertilizer for highest yields.
Farmers can increase yields by 20% and lower input cost 20%
• Liquid fertilizers for in
row and foliar feeding
• Rainfast surfactants
• Systems approach moving
growers out of yield rut
• Drift control
• Nitrogen slow-release
formula
• Grain bin and silage bag
repair products
• Manure pit treatments
• Chelated liquid
micronutrients stop yellow
flash from Roundup
®
• Seed treatments
• Forage preservatives
• Natural animal products
• Long distance lubricants
and fuel additives
WHOLESALE
DISTRIBUTORS
NEEDED
Buy wholesale direct from
farmer-owned 47-year-old
company based in MN
For a Free Catalog... call
FRANKE’S
CONKLIN
SERVICE
320-238-2370
or 855-238-2570
KEN FRANKE’S
CONKLIN
SERVICE
320-238-2370
or 855-238-2570
WWW. FRANKEMARKETI NG. COM
G A PRODUCCERS
on R ax 800 F
952-467-5243
o dY Yo o o w or N
d on R
952-467-5243
a meric A oung
THE F
g A
BANK LY AMI THE F
oda op in or call us t t S
ou the best oppor er y o offe t
k alongside y or essionals w of fe r P
ur A . O tnership a par
o y t t ommitmen ur c O
oda
. tunities ou the best oppor
ou k alongside y
g Business ur A
ou is truly o y
oda op in or call us t t S . y oda
ember FDIC M
KEN’S
EXCAVATING
SITE PREP &
BASEMENTS
MATERIAL
HAUL
Let us help you
make a Profit
At Crop Production Services our goal is
to help you maximize your yields - and
profits - on all your acres. Call on Crop
Production Services for sound agronomic
advice, dependable field services and
fertilizer, NH3, chemicals and seed for
your farming operation.
507-647-5329
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 9 - AG SCENE
PhiI, Bret, Jeff, Kirk, & Jason
Contact us for
your 2016 Seed
and Ag needs
Bird Island & 5acred Heart
320-365-4041 - 320-765-2222
By Dick Hagcn
Making a total switch lrom conven-
tional tillage to strip tillage on 3,¯00 acres
in one season may seem like a boonooggle.
Ano Brian Ryberg, ol Ryberg Iarms in
Bullalo Lake, won`t have oata until harvest
next lall to verily his wisoom, or lack
thereol. But at this stage Ryberg is conli-
oent, even exciteo that he ano his wile
Sanoy maoe the right oecision in a sit
oown, let`s talk¨ conlerence in the kitchen
ol their Sibley County larm home. He ao-
mits they were a bit uncomlortable in
those lirst oiscussions. But the more they
talkeo ano stuoieo, the more they lelt they
were heaoing in the right oirection.
We starteo ooing some serious looking
at what we were ooing to the soil structure
ol our larmlano. We simply oecioeo we
were going the wrong way,¨ saio Ryberg.
Iive years ol continuous corn in 22-
inch rows, though they also grow sugar
beets thus the 22-inch wioth, was their his-
tory lesson. Then a lew rows ol corn that
got planteo into a small patch ol grasslano
helpeo ease the oecision.
An accioent by chance openeo our
eyes. We hao taken oown a grove ano
some pasture lano. We planteo through
that piece ano coulon`t ligure out why the
corn was so much taller in the pasture lano
than where we hao been larming conven-
tionally lor ¯0 years,¨ saio Ryberg.
We starteo thinking about what`s going
on in these two environments ano what the
cost savings might be il we changeo tillage
systems. We were making lots ol trips
across our lielos ano just causing more
compaction.¨
Here`s what the Rybergs were ooing
running a Wishek Disc alter a chopping
corn heao lolloweo by a ripper to get a
gooo black surlace, both lor their continu-
ous corn lielos ano corn going to sugar
beets. Then belore planting a lielo cultiva-
tor to prepare a smooth, level seeo beo.
Lots ol lielo trips with lots ol equipment
so time lor a change.
We`ve switcheo to a strip till, single
pass machine calleo the Soil Warrior. Our
total lielo hours went lrom !30 hours with
two, !-wheel orive tractors oown to 210
hours with one !-wheel orive tractor,¨ saio
Ryberg. This rig makes the tilleo strips
plus applies lertilizer so essentially both
jobs on one pass. Ano that`s it. Next spring
we`re reaoy to plant.¨
Ano check the new luel economy.
This lall we were using six-tenths ol a
Farmer swltcbeo acreage to strlp tlllage ln 2015
Submltteo pboto
8rlan Ryberg useo tbe Soll Warrlor to strlp tlll ano tertlllze bls tlelo ln one pass at bls tamlly tarm ln 8uttalo Lake.
Tlllage
Turn to page
Tillage
Turn to page 10
AG SCENE - 10 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
gallon oiesel luel per acre compareo with
almost live gallons per acre with our con-
ventional rigs,¨ saio Ryberg. That was
both a tremenoous surprise ano recogni-
tion that we were making way too many
trips across our lielos.¨
New routlne
At Ryberg Iarms, the yearly cropping
program involves 2,200 acres continuous
corn, o00 acres ol sugar beets ano 700
acres ol soybeans. Soils are mostly silty
clay loams kept well oraineo through an
extensive pattern tileo system.
The resioue issue in 22-inch rows is not
an issue on the soybean ano beet grouno,
noteo Ryberg.
Corn stalks however can be a chal-
lenge. The Warrior has a oeep cog wheel
that hanoles trash better ano moves more
oirt. The tillage action ol this cog wheel
mixes trash into the row center builoing an
8-inch wioe ano 3-to-!-inch tall berm in
the process. Trash wheels on our planter
oo the line tuning that might be neeoeo,¨
he explaineo.
Soil Warriors are maoe by Environmen-
tal Tillage Systems in Iaribault. With a
machine that both tills ano lertilizes your
soils, these rigs are S300,000 lor the 2!-row
unit purchaseo by Ryberg Iarms.
We oio some research. Lots ol branos
in this strip till equipment but very lew
with 22-inch rows so this one seemeo to be
the Caoillac. The lact that it`s built in Min-
nesota we think is a plus too. Quick service
ano any questions reaoily answereo,¨ saio
Ryberg.
Going lorwaro he estimates a S90,000
yearly savings in luel, labor, ano lertilizer
costs, plus ongoing improvements in soil
structure, which Ryberg says are priceless
but vital to the luture sustainability ol row
crop larming.
The Ryberg`s Soil Warrior came with a
lertilizer tank so leeoing ano tillage is a
one-trip oeal. They plant with either a 2!-
row or 3o-row planter. They use an RTK
power steering system ano strip ano plant
between the olo rows.
It works like a charm,¨ saio Ryberg.
They oio a trial run last spring with a
leaseo Soil Warrior on 200 acres ol sugar-
beet stubble. This lall when strip tilling lor
next year`s corn they also applieo between
¯0 ano 70 pounos ol urea in the strip
along with variable rates ol F ano K rang-
ing lrom 7¯ to 3¯0 pounos per acre.
Because their lielos are mappeo ano soil
testeo, their Soil Warrior is set up to han-
ole variable lertilizer applications on the
go.
Next spring when planting they`ll oo a
weeo ano leeo program which incluoes ¯0
pounos ol 28 percent N ano Veroict herbi-
cioe to kick start the corn. Then they can
sioe oress aooitional applications as
neeoeo.
They`re not yet into variable rate popu-
lations, but it may be aooeo to their
agenoa soon as they have the tools to go
that route. With the neeo to trim input
costs, variable rates on both lertilizer ano
seeo are inevitable.
Ryberg saio he is intrigueo with this
new technology working its way into crop
proouction. Ano he has two great guys on
his crew that unoerstano these electronic
tools.
They set it up lor me ano I can then
run it too but they are the heao start guys
on these new systems,¨ Ryberg saio.
The equipment lineup lor Ryberg
Iarms is oown to the Soil Warrior lor
tillage ano lertilizer, two planters, a John
Deere combine with 12-row heao ano only
one ¯30 hp John Deere tractor. That sugar
beet crop also neeos a oeloliator ano 12-
row lilter.
What happens to the rest ol the equip-
ment that useo to lill up their 80 by 1¯0
loot metal machine sheo each lall? Some
ol it is alreaoy solo.
We have a oisc ripper that we`ll hang
on to because we also oo some custom
work. Ano we still have a lielo cultivator
just in case,¨ noteo Ryberg.
Brian ano Sanoy Ryberg own the larm-
ing corporation which also incluoes com-
mercial trucking in !8 states with the same
rigs hauling beets each lall. They have two
long-term guys that cover all the bases in
this proouctive ano ellicient operation.
We leel gooo about this. We think we
oio it lor all the right reasons, the most im-
portant being rebuiloing our soils,¨ saio
Ryberg. Yes, neighbors are watching ano
so are we¦ One ol my biggest naysayers re-
cently askeo il we coulo oo some strip
tillage lor him too.¨
Ior more inlormation about the Soil
Warrior, visit www.soilwarrior.com.
Dick Hagcn is a staff vritcr for Thc
Land, a farn and faniIy nagazinc
ovncd hy Thc Frcc Prcss Mcdia. This ar-
ticIc vas originaIIy puhIishcd in Thc
Land jan. 15 and 22.
lrom the {IeId to the rood, ond everythIng In-between,
we*ve got you covered. I{ we don*t hove It, we con get It.
OLIVIA MACHINE SHOP, INC
South on Hwy 71 Olivia, MN
Ph: (320) 523-1681
· Steel
· Bearings
· PTO Components
· Torches & Tanks
· Pipe Fittings
· Cable
· Hydraulic Hoses & Adapters
· Jonsered Chainsaw &
Trimmer/Brush Cutters
· Bolts - By the Pound
· Roller Chain & Sprockets
· Welding Supplies
· Hyrdraulic Adapters
· PVC Plastic Pipe & Fittings
· Log Chain, Hooks & Binders
· Welding & Repair
- Steel
- Stainless Steel
- Aluminum
- Portable Welding
*
Service Since 1956
*
Tlllage Contlnueo trom page
At NorthStar Genetics, we take pride in focusing on
specific geographies and finding the soybean
varieties that suit your farm the best.
Visit our website to see our trial data map and to
find a dealer near you.
At NorthStar Genetics, we know beans.
www.northstargenetics.com
N
O
R
T
H
STARGEN
E
T
I
C
S
.
C
O
M
LOCAL EXPERTS
We understand your land!
Haubrich Seed offers multiple
tools to help manage your resistant
weed issues.
Contact
Mike or Matt
320-250-1377
e understand your land! W
OCAL EXPERTS L
e understand your land!
OCAL EXPERTS
e understand your land!
.nor www w.
At NorthStar Genetics, we know beans.
find a dealer near you.
Visit our website to see our trial data map and to
varieties that suit your farm the best.
specific geographies and finding the soybean
At NorthStar Genetics, we take pride in focusing on
e understand your land! W
.northstargenetics.com
At NorthStar Genetics, we know beans.
find a dealer near you.
Visit our website to see our trial data map and to
varieties that suit your farm the best.
specific geographies and finding the soybean
At NorthStar Genetics, we take pride in focusing on
e understand your land!
At NorthStar Genetics, we know beans.
Visit our website to see our trial data map and to
specific geographies and finding the soybean
At NorthStar Genetics, we take pride in focusing on
e understand your land!
.nor www w.
weed issues.
tools to help manage your r
Haubrich Seed offers multip
rthstargenetics.com
Contact
esist tools to help manage your r
le Haubrich Seed offers multip
Contact
320-250-1377
Mike or Matt
320-250-1377
Mike or Matt
Tillage Continued from page 9
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 11 - AG SCENE
By Rich Glennie
Correspondent
T
he Buffalo Creek Watershed Dis-
trict (BCWD) is right in the mid-
dle of two major projects involv-
ing water runoff in the Glencoe area —
one is scheduled to begin in 2017, the
other is a future possibility.
The first is known as the Marsh Water
Project (west ditch) and the other is a pro-
posed plan to address water issues in the
northeast end of Glencoe near the high
school and heading east to the east ditch
system. The proposed east ditch work is
only in the preliminary discussion stage.
The Marsh project is scheduled to be
bid next year, and the moving of dirt and
construction of new culverts is planned for
2017, according to Larry Phillips of rural
Glencoe. Phillips also is a long-time board
manager with the BCWD.
Both projects will address nagging flood-
ing issues that have plagued Glencoe-area
residents for decades. The problem has al-
ways been over ownership of the privately-
owned portion of the west ditch system
and who would pay for the work. The
problem was settled when a Marsh Water
Management District was established in
2015, which allowed the BCWD to deter-
mine ownership and to assess part of the
costs to those benefiting landowners.
Phillips said in 2016, the assessment rolls
will be firmed up for the Marsh project,
and proper permits will be obtained from
the various state and federal agencies and
the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, among
others, before any work can begin.
Phillips said the Marsh project addresses
a long-standing problem of water runoff
from north and west of Glencoe that
drains through the west end of the com-
munity, through the Seneca Foods proper-
ty and through the Glencoe Cemetery be-
fore entering a 72-inch storm sewer that
runs under Highway 212 and into Buffalo
Creek.
Bonding will help pay for the $929,000
project, and Phillips said there is a
$290,000 Minnesota Pollution Control
Agency loan in hand. The estimated cost
of the project will be: storm water wetland
($427,500); storm sewer repairs ($115,400),
easements ($76,600), city culvert replace-
ment ($48,000), private culvert replace-
ment ($226,000) and buffer strips
($35,500).
The 16 percent portion of the ditch that
runs through Glencoe will be assessed to
the city. BCWD has the ability to assess
costs to those landowners outside Glencoe
city limits within the water management
district.
*****
The city of Glencoe petitioned the
BCWD for help with the Marsh Water
Project in 2014 after an earlier feasibility
study was completed. The project was de-
signed, hearings and meetings held, and
now permits are needed.
The Marsh Water Project looks at the
three branches of the west ditch — west,
main trunk and east. The three branches
drain a total area of 2,463 acres, of which
2,073 acres lie outside of Glencoe.
The study indicated there were several
problems with the west ditch, including
water quality, drainage issues from lack of
maintenance, storm sewer failures, espe-
cially in the cemetery, as well as flooding,
especially near the Haukos Trailer Park
and on agricultural fields that result in
crop loss.
The project also will reduce the sedi-
ment and nutrient issues, like phosphorus,
from getting into Buffalo Creek from the
ditch.
Another goal is to reduce the peak flows
into Buffalo Creek by utilizing water reten-
tion areas in its plan; it will reduce dam-
ages in the flood-prone areas along the
ditch system; and the project will improve
maintainability of the drainage system, ac-
cording to a report by Houston Engineer-
ing, Inc., a firm hired by the BCWD.
Parts of the proposed project presented
at an August 2015 public hearing include:
• A storm water wetland between High-
way 22 and County Road 3.
• Storm sewer repairs in the cemetery.
• Replacement of driveway and city
roadway culverts downstream (south) of
County Road 3.
• Purchase easements for maintenance
and establish buffer strips along the east
branch and main truck lines of the west
ditch.
West branch
Improvements to the west branch of the
ditch system include:
• A seven-acre pond/wetland just south
of Highway 22.
• Realigning the main west branch
channel.
• The removal of 67 pounds per year of
phosphorus and 23 tons a year of sedi-
ment.
• Decrease the flood elevation from a
three-inch rainfall by nearly a half a foot at
County Road 3.
Storm sewer repairs
Improvements to the storm sewers
through Seneca property and the cemetery
include:
• Replacing an inlet on Seneca property.
• Installing an additional manhole just
south of Sixth Street.
• Repair concrete pipe through the
cemetery.
The results will extend the life of the sys-
tem, the report stated.
Culvert replacements
Over the years, and after many studies,
constrictions at culverts under Highway 22
and County Road 3 were indentified as
crucial elements of any fix.
The Houston Engineering study pro-
posed replacing four culverts south of
County Road 3 through Seneca property
and removing one ditch crossing on the
south side of the Seneca plant.
The goal is to reduce flood elevation for
a seven-inch rainfall by nearly a foot near
the railroad tracks. Phillips said of taking a
foot off the peak of the 2014 floods, “that’s
a lot.”
It also would reduce long-term mainte-
nance costs, the study predicted.
Buffer strips/easements
Also included in the study were the use
of buffer strips consisting of undisturbed
grass along the ditch to reduce sedimenta-
tion and phosphorus from getting into the
ditch and into Buffalo Creek. The BCWD
would handle long-term maintenance of
the buffer strips. The widths of the ease-
ments would be 30 to 70 feet, the report
indicated. Those easements need to be
purchased.
The cost breakdown included the water-
shed district paying $485,264 of the total
$929,000 project. The city of Glencoe
would pay for $156,960, and the water
management district would fund $286,776
through assessments to property owners
along the ditch.
According to the study, the Marsh
Water Management District charges are
based on acreage and land use and will be
on the property tax statements as a special
assessment.
The assessment is payable over 10 years
at 2 percent interest (only for charges over
$300).
The study used the example of per-acre
charges:
• Row crops: $143 per acre.
• Residential: $132 to $157 per acre;
• Commercial: $177 per acre;
• Road authorities: $163 per acre.
*****
While things are slated on the west ditch
work, the same cannot be said of the
northeast side of Glencoe. At a recent
Glencoe City Council meeting, Justin
Black of Short Elliott Hendrickson (SEH),
estimated work to extend a 30-inch or 36-
inch storm sewer from near the high
school east along 16th Street and farther
east to the east ditch to cost about $1 mil-
lion
The goal is to relieve pressure on areas
like the Willow Ridge holding ponds by
providing an improved outlet when the
ponds are full, and then drain that runoff
water to the east, instead of south through
the center of Glencoe.
One other part of the project would be
the replacement of a 48-inch sewer line
under the Twin Cities & Western Railroad
tracks along the east ditch with a 72-inch
line. That would match up with a 72-inch
lines both north and south of the tracks in
the east ditch.
The big question is who pays for it, and
what is the share. Involved in the discus-
sions are the BCWD, Glencoe city staff,
McLeod County staff and township repre-
sentatives and farmers located along the
east ditch and north within the watershed.
A state grant also is being sought to help
pay some of the improvement costs.
Two drainage projects slated in Glencoe area
The above graphic, furnished by the Buffalo Creek Watershed District (BCWD), shows the exent of the area that will be
served by a proposed Marsh Water District project.
AG SCENE - 12 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
GAVIN, WINTERS
& LONG, LTD.
Glencoe’s Local Attorneys
Accident & Death Cases,
Work Compensation,
Elder Law, Medical Assistance,
Trusts, Estate Planning, Probate,
Real Estate, Corporate & Business,
Divorce, Custody, Child Support,
Criminal, DWI, Trials, Bankruptcy,
Bill Collection, Municipal &
Utility Law, Mediation.
www.goslawfirm.com
320-864-5142
1017 Hennepin Ave. N.
Glencoe, MN 55336
Lawyers:
Michael M. Gavin
Jody L. Winters
Amber R. Donley
Mark W. Ostlund
Do you have a financial PLAN?*
We’re more than just tax preparers.
WE GIVE ADVICE!
Let the local professionals – Kevin, Tim, Chip,
Mona and Steph – help you with your life’s issues.
Anyone can manage your money*
– We help manage AND plan your financial life.
Service Areas Include: Accounting • Tax • Investments*
Insurance • Retirement • Rollovers* • Estate Planning
and Much More
214 West Elm St.
Norwood
(952) 467-2407
105 West Main St.
Arlington
(507) 964-5868
1721 10th St. East
Glencoe
(320) 864-6166
*Securities offered through HD Vest Investment Services
SM
, Member: SIPC, Advisory services are offered through
H.D. Vest Advisory Services
SM
.
Kevin Lindstrand CPA Tim Schuth CPA Mona Platt CPA
Chip Anderson CFP
®
Steph Schlauderaff CPA
EXSTED
REALTY
2124 10th St E Glencoe
(320) 864-5544
www.exstedrealty.com
Willard
Exsted
Rebecca
Tuchtenhagen
New Listings Needed!
Buyers Available.
We have buyers willing to pay top dollar
for farm land. If you are looking to sell
your farm, or just downsize the number
of acres you have, GIVE US A CALL.
Buying and selling
farms for 46 years
in the McLeod,
Carver, Renville
& Sibley County
areas!
W
e S
ell T
he B
est
For all your Surveying/Development needs
•Boundary/Land Surveys
•Building/Farm Site Surveys
•Farm Tile Plan & Profiles
Prompt/Professional Service
with Great Rates!
Attention to Detail and
Personal Needs
www.egrud.com
Hutchinson: 320-587-2025
Waconia: 952-442-5348
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 13 - AG SCENE
910 E. 10
th
St., Glencoe
320-864-5525
www.napastargroup.com
HOURS: M-F 7:30am-8pm; Sat. 7:30am-5pm; Sun. 9am-3pm
March
10-24
By Lori Copler
Editor, McLeod County Chronicle
The use of plastics has exploded in the
United States, and the agriculture indus-
try is no exception. Plastic is used for
everything from covering large piles of
corn at grain elevators to covering hay
and straw bales and feed.
And that means everyone — from
manufacturers to local farmers — is
looking for ways to dispose of it when it
is no longer needed.
McLeod County Solid Waste is hop-
ing to help by accepting it at its Materi-
als Recovery Facility (MRF), and selling
it to a vendor who recycles it back into
ag plastic.
Don Hopp, manager of the MRF, said
the solid waste department is always
looking at new “niches” for recycling
and reusing waste.
Hopp said it was becoming obvious
that adequately disposing of ag plastic
“was becoming more of an issue.” The
problem with plastic, Hopp said, is that
it doesn’t decompose, so landfills don’t
want it. And it’s illegal to burn plastics.
Sarah Young, McLeod County Solid
Waste coordinator, said McLeod Coun-
ty has been keeping an eye on what was
happening with Tri-County South, a
three-county solid waste department. In
effort to discourage farmers from burn-
ing or burying ag plastic, Tri-County
South began accepting it about 10 years
ago. However, it didn’t have an outlet
for the collected material, and it ended
up in landfills.
McLeod County began accepting the
material from local farmers. Once it
began to take the plastic, word of mouth
led others to begin bringing material to
the MRF in Hutchinson.
Now, said Hopp, MRF is getting calls
from all over.
“We’re getting calls from Wisconsin,
North and South Dakota,” said Hopp.
“It’s a huge problem everywhere. No
one knows what to do with it.”
And people do want to do something
with it, Hopp indicated. Most farmers
are good stewards of the land, and don’t
want to burn, bury or landfill the materi-
al.
“I’ve got a guy who’s willing to drive
four hours to bring his plastic here,” said
Hopp. “That’s dedication to recycling
… that’s dedication to wanting to do
what’s right.”
Another couple, Hopp said, brought a
load of plastic in a horse trailer. The
MRF weighed it and determined that it
weighed about 650 pounds.
“They were really proud of that,” said
Ag plastic: McLeod County may
become a hub
Baled plastic, including “ag plastics,” awaits shipping to a
recycling vendor from the McLeod County Solid Waste
Department’s Materials Recovery Facility (MRF), located in
Hutchinson.
Ag plastic
Turn to page 15
AG SCENE - 14 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
FAkN ICAN5
* Cpero|ing Ioons
* Iives|ock Ioons
* Nochinery Ioons
* keol Es|o|e Ioons
Con|oc| Al Iorson
lor more inlormo|ion.
200 Oak Street, Danube
(320) 826-2525
www.minnwestbank.com
Member FDIC
CALL GREGG HELIN FOR A QUOTE TODAY!
· |·sto''otc· |e,'o:e·e·t c· |e,o·
· Cect·e··o' ¯,e·ts
· |ooo·t · t·e ¯'cc· ¬eot·¸
· |ctc!·.s·
®
^· |.:t C'eo··¸
· ^·o /c·e
NUK1HLKN FLUMbINú Q HLÅ1INú, INL.
320-523-5862 · 808 East DePue Ave. · Olivia
www.northernplumbingheating.com
Residential & Commercial
Plumbing · Heating · Cooling
|·o¦ess|ooa| C·oo Ca·e |ooe b¸ /|·
Richard Sigurdson
Office
320-523-2186
Cell
320-979-8326
P.O. Box 169
Olivia, MN 56277
Willmar
Aerial
Spraying, Inc.
Co-op Country Farmers Elevator with Locations in
Danube · Renville · Sacred Heart
EmpIoyees
Jeremy Aeikens
Teresa Anderson
Larry Arentson
Carrie Ashburn
Dick Ashburn
John Benson
Brian Block
Todd Broberg
Brooke Carlson
Kyle Clouse
Tom Decknatel
Greg Dikken
Harlen Eliason
Mike Filzen
Craig Gartner
Cole Gigstad
Roger Groen
Carla Hamre
Mike Hannah
Harley Haug
Brooke Hebrink
Craig Hebrink
Steve Helmer
Joe Hennen
Katy Holland
Paul Holm
Brett Holwerda
Jacob Honzay
Josh Honzay
Mike Kemnitz
Ryan Kiecker
Gerry Kodet
Mike Kohout
Pete Lanning
Jill Marcus
John McNamara
Jeff Mikosch
Matt Morris
Jeff Padrnos
Ron Pape
Lynne Payne
Brian Peterson
Keith Potter
Sandy Refsland
Jared Ridl
Paul Schueller
Rick Stadther
Daron Strey
Business Office: PO Box 604, RenviIIe, MN 56284 · 320-329-8377 or 800-962-7007 · www.coopcountry.com
Hopp, “that they kept 650 pounds of
that stuff out of the landfill.”
The demand is growing, and McLeod
County is hoping to rise to the occasion.
It recently hosted a gathering of neigh-
boring county officials, the Minnesota
commissioner of agriculture, representa-
tives from the Minnesota Pollution Con-
trol Agency and from the non-profit
agency, Recyling Association of Min-
nesota.
Knowing that the problem of recy-
cling ag plastics beyond the county’s
borders — in fact, beyond Minnesota’s
borders — McLeod County is trying to
create a collaborative effort where Solid
Waste’s MRF will be a collection and
processing point.
In fact, the county recently adopted a
$40 tip fee for out-of-county material
brought to the MRF so that it would not
be subsidizing out-of-county recycling
efforts.
Hopp said the goal is to get the mate-
rial to the facility at no cost to McLeod
County, and for a little income to help
process it and transport it to the recy-
cling vendor.
Young said that another meeting will
likely be held soon to see how things
have progressed since the initial meet-
ing.
And while McLeod County hopes to
be a leader in being a “hub” for collect-
ing and recycling the material, it knows
that the huge amount of plastics may, at
some point, push it to expand yet again.
“There will be a threshold where we’ll
have to do something,” said Young.
“We’re not sure what that threshold is
yet, but at some point we’ll have to look
at other options.”
Once it began recycling ag plastic,
other markets came to the fore, such as
boat wrap, the plastic shrink wrap that is
used to protect boats in winter so they
do not need to be stored inside.
And greenhouses and gardening cen-
ters, which use tree wrap, plastic seed
containers and disposable soaker hoses,
also are looking at ways to recycle their
waste.
In the meantime, McLeod County is
continue to accept ag plastic from local
residents and farmers. It can be brought
to the MRF, which is located at 1065
Fifth Ave. SE, Hutchinson.
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 15 - AG SCENE
1 % OFF
®®
866-871-1040 LibertyTax.com
ff
15% OFF
TAX PREPARATION
SERVICES
921 12th St E
Behind City Center
Glencoe, MN 55336
320-864-4007
ax TTa yyT t Liber 866-871-1040
320-864-4007
55336 MN Glencoe,
Center City Behind
E St 12th 921
ff
om ax.c
55336
Center
For new customers. Valid at participating locations. Cannot be
combined with other offers or used toward past services. One
coupon per customer and per return. Other exclusions may apply.
Void where prohibited by law. Valid 3/1-4/10/2016.
The Supreme Court ruled in favor of
a raisin farmer in a test that challenged
the government’s right to take private
property.
The USDA program
for raisins allowed the
government to take up
to 47 percent of the
total crop to use as it
wants in the name of
boosting prices.
You can argue
whether it worked or
not, but one farmer
said “no, those are my
raisins, if you want
them you buy them.”
The government fined him close to a
half million dollars and they went to
court.
The farmer won in a case that went
the way it should have. You can’t have
the government taking private property
in the name of “helping” farmers.
In this case, supply
and demand would do
the same thing. If
prices dropped, farm-
ers would raise fewer
raisins. Higher prices,
more product.
It’s unfortunate it
had to cost a lot of
money in legal bills
and almost bankrupt a
farmer to come to
this, but it’s over.
That’s the good news.
Finally, victory for the
raisin farmers
Lynn Ketelsen
Lynn Ketelson is the Farm Director
for Linder Farm Network.
Ag plastics Continued from page 13
JERRY
SCHARPE, LTD
712 E. 13th St., Glencoe
Income Tax Preparation
Business, Farm, Personal,
Estate & Gift Returns
Monthly Accounting, Payroll
& Financial Statements
Jerry Scharpe, CPA
Jeffrey Scharpe, RAP
Tel: 320-864-5380
Fax: 320-864-6434
Serving clients since 1971
AG SCENE - 16 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 17 - AG SCENE
By Rich Glennie
Correspondent
For years, the general public has seen
Leedstone trucks running around the
Glencoe area, but few knew just what
the company was about. But ask any
area dairyman, cattleman or horse
owner, and they know Leedstone very
well.
Leedstone has been in Glencoe for
4
1
⁄2 years. It is an animal health busi-
ness started by the Tomsche family, and
is now entering its fourth generation of
veterinarians.
The veterinarian tradition was started
by Dr. Emil Tomsche in 1929 in Al-
bany, and was passed on to his son, Ed,
and then Ed’s sons, David and Daniel.
Now veterinarian Dr. Grant Tomsche,
Ed’s grandson, has joined the family tra-
dition.
The Glencoe office of Leedstone, lo-
cated at 2580 E Ninth St. in the former
Triple G Distributing building owned by
Loren Lange, is managed by Ron
Robinson, a Hutchinson native, who has
been in the farm supply industry since
1980. Robinson said he started work for
Mid American Dairymen right after his
discharge from the Navy.
Robinson said the local Leedstone’s
service area ranges from Highway 12
west to Litchfield, south to Sleepy Eye as
well as near I-90 in southern Minnesota
and as far east as I-35 near Faribault.
The Glencoe facility includes a retail
sales office as well as a large warehouse,
and offers a wide range of animal health
services and supplies. It also installs and
services dairy equipment and offers a
farm-to-farm route service, in which it
delivers cleaning supplies, milking equip-
ment among many other items.
“Whatever is needed on a dairy
farm,” Robinson added.
With a staff of 11 at the Glencoe facili-
ty, Robinson said the company is look-
ing to add two more service technicians.
“We will train if need be.”
“It’s a demanding industry,” Robin-
son said of the dairy industry, “but it
continues to grow. Considering the low
milk prices, it’s been very good for the
company.”
Asked about Leedstone’s future,
Robinson said, “ The ag industry needs
supplies, and it always will.”
Robinson said herds continue to get
bigger, but that has been a trend even
before he got into the business in the
1980s. That applies to not only dairy
herds, but cattle and hogs, too.
As to the dairy industry, Robinson
said few younger people want “to be tied
down to milking,” so he thinks the intro-
duction of robots into the process may
“save small dairies.”
Robinson said Leedstone owners
Dave and Daniel Tomsche want to con-
tinue to build their business “for their
children, and want to be in the ag indus-
try for years to come.”
*****
The four generations of Tomsches
also continue to offer a full-service vet-
erinary practice called Minnesota Vet-
erinary Associates (MVA) and has clinics
in Albany, Little Falls, Melrose, Rice
and Sauk Centre, according to an article
in the University of Minnesota College
of Veterinary Medicine. The vet clinics
cover most of central Minnesota. The
article profiled the four generations of
Tomsche veterinarians.
MVA employs 10 veterinarians, along
with 20 certified veterinary technicians,
veterinary assistants and administrative
staff.
Melrose-based Leedstone came into
being in 1994 when Daniel and David
Tomsche expanded into retail sales, first
as Stearns Farm and Feed and then as
Stearns Veterinary Outlet and Pharma-
cy. The Leedstone name was announced
in March 2013 “to simplify communica-
tions and better align all of our products
and services under one umbrella,” the
Tomsches stated.
As to the future, the Tomsches stated:
“Moving forward and exploring new
ideas, trends and equipment are always
at the forefront of the industry and of
our company.” While the Tomsches ex-
pect new challenges, “… we’ll never lose
sight of our focus of supporting produc-
ers, their herds and their livelihoods.”
Today, Leedstone sells more than
1,500 animal care products, including
pharmaceuticals, to consumers, farms
and veterinarians, the UM article stated.
It added that the company employs 80
people and exports animal health care
products and feed additives to Japan.
Leedstone is still family-owned “and
we remain true to our vision to buy right
and pass the savings onto you; and in a
small way, passing a stronger legacy to
new generations,” they added.
Leedstone: A quiet, but important
presence in Glencoe
Leedstone, an animal health and dairy supply company, has maintained a base of operations on Ninth Street E in Glencoe
for the past 4-1/2 years, and currently has 11 employees.
Pictured are members of Leedstone’s staff, including, from left to right, Jackie
Johnson, an office assistant, General Manager Ron Robinson and Josie Sanken,
an office assistant.
AG SCENE - 18 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
¯
0LIfIâ
18¿9 w LI000I0 ât0
hWJ ¿1¿
J¿0·ã¿J·7JJ0
fâß60
JâML8¡0wh
0LfIL8 LâkL
8I8Mâß6k
0I6kIh80h
MIh0¡
M00ßhLâ0
0L¡ß0I¡ LâkL8
0LIfIâ
â8Lß0LLh
h0ß0h
8I00I fâLL8
wâ¡Lß¡0wh
8I0l0 h00lt.
M·flI.
7.J08N·ëþN
88I. 88N·ãþN
800. 1¿·ãþN
PRODUCTS NOW ONLÌNE!
0l00l 8I tI0l0 I0l fßLL t0IþþI0¶
N80t08l0W8l0.00N
fItII N80t08l0W8l0.00N
I0 l0¶ItI0l I0l ¡0KI 0l LN8II
f0l LK0I0tIt0
Mâ6'8 0II0ltI
Mâ68
I0 Jã¿70
f00l 800l00 I0l f8lN, h0N0, ê I000tIlJ
FL08 M06h M0ßL ¡hâh f00 LIFL6¡I
Mâ6'8 08t W08I J00 0Kþ00I Il0N 8 08l0W8l0 tI0l0
¯
0
F
L
h
0Fh0L8¡Lßf
Special order
any fabric
¡hL 8hL0
Surplus with
added value
fâ8¡LhLß8
Largest supplier
in the area
h08¡âL6I6
Largest soda
selection
ßâ6kIh6
Storage for farm,
home, & industry
6hâIh, ß0FL,
6â8LL Largest
selection in the area
¡00L8
Basic to professional
quality
¡00L ¡â8LL8
Tools, Value, &
Selection
FâIh¡/80h0ßIL8 LLL6¡ßI6âL 8Lâ80hâL h008LwâßL8 â0¡0M0¡IfL
¯
t 8 0 8 6
0 þ K 0 0 0 J I 8 0 W t
W 0 l 8 0 8 N 0 l I I 0 0
0 l 0 I t 0 l 8 W
L I ß 0 h 0 8 //8 ¡¡/ h I â FFâ
8 â L 6 I ß ¡ 6 L L L
L 0 â 8 â L 8
L L â h 0 8 0 0 h
8 0 L ß â w L â
L f I ¡ 0 M 0 ¡ 0
8 0 L F
8 ß L h L ¡ 8 â f
a e r a e h t n i
r e i l p p u s t s e g r a L
¡ L ß 0 M h 6 0 M 8
L F I L 0 0 f h â h ¡
8 L 0 0 ¡
y t i l a u q
l a n o i s s e f o r p o t c i s a B
I ¡ 6 L
8 â 6
â h 6
e l e s
L L 8
, L F 0 ß , h I â
a e r a e h t n i n o i t c
t s e g r a L
f ß L ¡ 8 L 0 h F 0
c i r b a f y n a
r e d r o l a i c e p S
8 L L 8 â ¡¡â L 0 0 ¡
n o i t c e l e S
& , e u l a VVa , s l o o TTo
â ß
o h
t S
6 h I k 6 â
y r t s u d n i & , e m o
, m r a f r o f e g a r o t
l 0 0 f
0 L h 8 L h ¡
e u l a v d e d d a
h t i w s u l p r u S
N l 8 f l 0 I 0 0 l 0 0 8
0 0 0 I ê , 0 N 0 h , N
J l I t 0
h
e s
a L
6 I 6 L â ¡¡â 8 0
n o i t c e l e
a d o s t s e g r a
¯
¯
0 J J 7 · J ¿ ã · 0 ¿ J
¿ 1 ¿ J WWJ h
0 t â 0 I 0 0 0 I L w 9 ¿ 8 1
â I f I L 0
h w 0 ¡ ß L ¡ ââ¡ wwâ
8 L L â fâ I 0 0 I 8
h 0 ß 0 h
h L L 0 ß L 8 â
â I f I L 0
8 L k â L ¡ I 0 ß ¡ L 0
0 â L h ß 0 0 M
N þ ã · ¿ 1 . 0 0 8
N þ ã · N 8 8 . I 8 8
N þ ë · N 8 0 J . 7
. I l f · M
. t l 0 0 h 0 l 0 I 8
¡ 0 h I M
h 0 8 h I k 6 I 0
k 6 ß â M 8 I 8
L k â L 8 L I f L 0
h w 0 ¡ 8 L M â J
0 6 ß â f
8
0 I
t I f
M
0 f
0 7 ¿¿7 ã Jã
0 II0
8
U D O R P
I 8 l 0 0 l 0
t 0 8 N
N L l 0 I KKI 0 ¡¡0 l 0 I l 0 I t I ¶ 0 l
N 0 0 . 0 l 8 W 0 l 8 0 t 0 8 N I I t
I t l 0 I I 0 8 ' 6 â M
0 t I t 0 I 0 K L l 0
! E N Ì L N O W O N S T C U
¶ 0 I þ þ I 0 t L L ß f l 0 I 0 l 0 I t I
N 0 0 . 0 l 8 W 0 l 8 0 t
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 19 - AG SCENE
By Lukc Stadthcr
Editor, RenvIlle County RegIster
212 Seeo ano Ag, a company owneo
ano operateo by live partners: Fhil Smith,
Jason Rice, Bret Neubauer, Kirk Ellering
ano Jell Boersma, was establisheo in 2013
with locations in Biro Islano, Olivia, ano
Sacreo Heart. The company provioes serv-
ices to local area larmers which incluoe:
seeo sales ,Fioneer brano,, seeo treatments
lor soybeans, crop insurance, crop protec-
tion ,DuFont chemical,, Frecision Flanting
equipment ano precision consulting serv-
ices ,seeoing Rx´lertilizer Rx,.
Their goal, accoroing to Jell Boersma, a
consultant at 212 Seeo ano Ag, is to re-
ouce the cost ol proouction per bushel lor
our customers.¨ They accomplish this by
ollering customers new agricultural tech-
nologies alongsioe their many years ol
combineo experience.
All the members ol the team are in-
volveo with seeo sales which incluoe per-
sonalizeo treatment options that are
applieo to the seeo oirectly.
Fhil ano Jason oeal with the crop insur-
ance that is provioeo to their customers.
Fhil has 2¯ years ol experience with the
Fioneer brano ano Jason was previously a
crop consultant at Co-op Country
Iarmer`s Elevator lor almost two oecaoes.
Jason also works alongsioe Kirk on crop
protection plans lor the customers. Kirk
spent over a oecaoe as an employee ol the
Biro Islano Soil Service belore coming to
work lor 212 Seeo ano Ag.
Bret Neubauer, also an experienceo Fio-
neer brano provioer, is involveo in supply-
ing customers with many ol the
equipment options provioeo by Frecision
Flanting LLC.
Lastly, Jell has 10 years ol agricultural
experience ano works closely with cus-
tomers as the company`s precision consult-
ant. His goal is to provioe the customers
with actionable plans useo to optimize elli-
ciency ol lertilizers being applieo. He ooes
this using the resources provioeo by
DuFont Fioneer, specilically a program
calleo Encirca.
Encirca is a service Fioneer provioes to
customers that uses new technologies to
maximize yielos while reoucing customer
risk by helping them make more ellective
ano ellicient lertilizer application oeci-
sions. The technologies are mainly locuseo
on weather, soils, ano agronomy. This oata
is analyzeo ano then useo to create cus-
tomizeo plans lor each customer lielo by
lielo.
Through a partnership with DTN, Fio-
neer provioes customers with up-to-oate
weather inlormation incluoing ollering
real-time, location specilic weather reao-
ings. This is oone by the largest rural
weather network involving on larm meas-
urement stations.
Soil, another locus, is very important in
the proouction ol crops. Encirca services
provioes 3D compositions ol lielo soil
which can help in oetermining the quan-
tity ol inputs neeoeo to maximize ellec-
tiveness ano reouce overall cost.
Encirca ties variable rate seeoing into a
customizeo lertility plan that allows lor tar-
geteo variable rate nitrogen application
rather than the blanket¨ or one llat rate
over an entire lielo approach. All soil types
act oillerently ano each seeo variety reacts
oillerently. These along with other vari-
ables create the oemano lor crop consult-
ants with sophisticateo soltware´equip-
ment to line up the correct proouct ano
rates per acre.
Belore Encirca, Jell useo an unmanneo
aerial vehicle ,UAV,, in the lorm ol a re-
mote controlleo airplane, to take reaoings
over a lielo. The oata collecteo was uti-
lizeo to proouce oetaileo maps that Jell
woulo then use to provioe customers with
a unique lielo scouting approach.
T N I W
A S R E T
! E L
a a e e s s a a h h c c r r u u P P
e e c c e e R R
e e n n g g i i s s e e b b t t s s u u m m t t c c a a r r t t n n o o C C
h h c c r r a a M M n n o o s s s s e e n n i i s s u u b b
aa ee ss aa hh cc rr uu PP
e cc ee RR
e nn gg ii ss ee bb tt ss uu mm tt cc a rr t nn o CC
h cc rr aa MM nn oo ss ss ee nn ii ss uu bb
d d e e t t c c u u r r t t s s n n o o C C y y l l l l u u F F
t t n n u u o o c c s s i i D D a a e e v v i i e e
c c e e r r t t n n e e m m y y a a p p n n w w o o d d & & d d e e
c c e e p p s s e e v v i i e e c c e e r r o o t t 6 6 1 1 0 0 2 2 , , 4 4 h h
dd ee tt cc uu rr tt ss nn oo CC yy ll ll uu FF
t nn uu oo cc ss ii DD aa ee vv ii e
cc ee rr tt nn ee mm yy a pp nn ww oo dd && dd e
c ee pp ss ee v ii ee cc ee rr oo tt 66 11 00 22 , 44 h
c u r t s n o C
a e d u l c n i
i l d
g g n n i i d d l l i i u u B B
t t
f f o o e e s s o o l l c c y y b b d d e e v v i i e e
. . g g n n i i c c i i r r p p l l a a i i c c
gg nn ii dd ll ii uu BB
t
ff oo ee ss oo ll cc yy bb dd ee v ii ee
.. gg nn ii cc ii rr pp ll aa ii c
s g n i d l i u b d e t c
s u l p , rr, o b a l l l a
l i 0 0 1 t
L I U B R U O F O L L A
G # 0 5 ; s e s s u r T # 5 3 ~
C , l a r e t a L , d n i W l l A ~
n e t s a F w e r c S ~
m i n i M ~
F E H T E R U T A E F S G N I D
n o C ~ d a o L w o n S d n u o r G
B e e n K d n a , r e n r o C , k l a w t a C
l i a N ~ s r e n - C d e t a n i m a L
n e m d e b m E n m u l o C ¨ 6 ` 4 m u m
u y r e v i l e d
p u t h g i l S ( - a h c
: G N I W O L L O F
s g n i t o o F e t e r c n
d e d u l c n I g n i c a r
s n m u l o C
t n
s e l i m 0 0 1 o t p u
) s e l i mi 0 0 1 r e v o r o ffo e g r
y l z z i r G
y w H 7 0 3 9 2
: D S / N M 0 2 3 - 2 8
e r F l l o T
g . w w w
n I , s g n i d l i u B y
N M , e b u n a D 2 1 2 y
6 2 - 2 1 5 2 : a w o I 7
: e e 6 6 8 - 2 9 8 - 4 3
o c . s g n i d l i u b y l z z i r g
. c n
3 2 6 5 N 0
2 1 - 9 3 5 - 0 2 5 8
9 8 4
m o
212 Seeo ano Ag: A new company, years ot e×perlence
New UAv wltb N|R (near-lntrareo) ano RG8 sensors.
Pboto by Luke Staotber
212
Turn to page
MAKE IT HAPPEN!
Buy it · Sell it ·Rent it
Find it · Trade it · Fix it
Each Week, Reach Your
Prime Target Market.
Affordably. Effectively.
Renville County Register,
Renville County Shopper,
Golden Galaxy, Western Peach
320-523-2032 or 320-329-3324
212
Turn to page 20
AG SCENE - 20 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
212: Technology advancements direct future of farming Continued from page 19
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 21 - AG SCENE
By Rich Glennie
Correspondent
O
ne of the hottest political
battles in the country has
nothing to do with the presi-
dential races or the price of oil, but
rather our most common commodity
… water.
There has been a long-running feud
between Arizona and California as
they battle over water rights to the
Colorado River, and it encompasses
much of the Southwest United States.
But the battle about water and water
quality is not confined to the South-
west. Some parts of the country have
experienced extended droughts, others
extensive flooding.
In the Land of 10,000 or more lakes,
few think much about the state’s water
problems, but Minnesota has its own
issues, and those problems also impact
McLeod County and the Glencoe
area.
Right in the middle of some of the
current and future and, at times, con-
troversial, decisions concerning water
quality, water runoff and drainage is
the Buffalo Creek Watershed District
Board (BCWD). A member of that
board is Larry Phillips, a Glencoe-area
farmer. He has been on the little-
known, yet very influentia,l BCWD
Board for over 30 years.
Over much of its existence, the
BCWD Board has kept a low profile,
but it has been thrust into a lead role
in recent years, and it wields a power-
ful say about what can and cannot go
into Buffalo Creek, and at what rate.
That authority has impacted resi-
dential and commercial development
as well as rural farming practices in the
past, and will into the future.
So what is the BCWD and what
does it do?
The short answer is BCWD “was es-
tablished to help alleviate water prob-
lems, enhance the livability, maintain
and improve the economic well being
of the residents within the district,” ac-
cording to its brochure. In a nutshell,
it looks at flood control, water quality
and drainage systems. It also adminis-
ters storm water and drainage rules
and enforces state drainage laws.
In reality, whatever is being pro-
posed within the BCWD cannot pro-
ceed without BCWD permission, and
whatever is proposed can’t increase the
flow of water into Buffalo Creek, or it
won’t be allowed.
So a solution for one party may
cause problems for another, especially
for those downstream.
Combined with that possible conflict
is the size of the BCWD, which en-
compasses 422 square miles and in-
cludes a portion of Renville County,
the southern one-third of McLeod
County and small portions of Kandiy-
ohi, Sibley and Carver counties. With-
in that watershed district lies six cities
and 28 townships.
“The counties have different dynam-
ics,” Phillips admitted, and “once in
awhile there are serious controversies.”
The BCWD Board consists of five
appointed managers: two from
Renville County, two from McLeod
County and one from Sibley County.
They meet once a month, and the
board members are paid $75 a month,
Phillips said. He admitted it’s basically
a volunteer job.
Terms of their appointments are for
three years, and the appointments are
made by the county commissioners of
each county. Phillips said the appoint-
ment process helps alleviate “playing
politics.” Besides Phillips, the other
BCWD managers are Corey Henke of
McLeod County, Larry Kraemer and
Matt Melberg of Renville County and
Don Belter of Sibley County.
*****
Phillips said he got on the board be-
cause of his father, Bud Phillips, who
was one of the original petitioners to
form the watershed district in the
1960s. BCWD was established Jan. 30,
1969, by the Minnesota Board of
Water and Soil Conservation. Phillips
said his father didn’t want to sit on the
board, but thought his son should.
“We (the Phillips family) lived on the
creek, and I was brought up and raised
there,” he added. So being on the
BCWD Board was a natural. “It took
me 10 years to figure out what was
going on,” he smiled.
So why has be stayed on the board
for so long? Phillips said he never real-
ly thought about it. “I guess the reason
is to help people.”
That help includes such things as the
removal of channel obstructions in
Buffalo Creek, although BCWD does
not remove any dirt or stumps from
the creek, he stressed.
Other BCWD projects have includ-
ed the deepening of the outlet of
Schilling Lake into Buffalo Creek, per-
mitting drainage ditch improvements,
reconstructing creek banks, doing ero-
sion control and channel realignment
projects. It also does water quality
sampling from April through October
each year.
BCWD Board members carry a lot
of clout and that clouts includes re-
quiring permits within the watershed
for tiling, ditching, water discharging,
installation of underground storage
tanks, cleaning out a water course, any
alteration in water quality, any under-
ground construction, ponding or
berming work, wastewater lagoons,
dams, dikes and crossing construction,
wetland modifications and stream,
creek or river projects as well as any
earth moving.
Since 1989, BCWD also began mon-
itoring water quality and flows of Buf-
falo Creek and must follow state and
federal statutes as well as its own.
It also has the ability to assess up to
$250,000 a year for its purposes.
The BCWD is flat, Phillips said. It
drops only about a foot in elevation
from Brownton to Glencoe, but he said
the flow picks up north of Plato all the
way to Lester Prairie.
“When dealing with water, there are
always oddities,” Phillips said. For ex-
ample, while you can clean out ditch-
es, federal rules prohibit making the
ditches deeper or wider.
Phillips said BCWD works extensive-
ly with Roger Berggren, the county en-
vironmentalist, as well as Ryan Fre-
itag, of the federal Soil and Water
Conservation District (SWCD) office.
While McLeod County has its
unique drainage issues, Phillips said
Renville County has even more
drainage needs that require a full-time
drainage administrator, who deals only
with tiles and ditch matters.
*****
So, what has changed over the past
30 years?
“Water still runs downhill,” Phillips
smiled.
But he said as land values have risen,
so has the pressure on tiling and drain-
ing land to get them into production.
“We regulate what is allowed.”
Phillips said issues are a lot more
complicated now, and there is an in-
creased need to work with neighbors,
as well as farmers working with city
representatives to address mutual
water concerns.
Becoming a bigger concern is the
ditching system, much of which was
constructed in the 1930s and 1940s.
Many are failing or have been neglect-
ed, Phillips said. Landowners need to
petition to redo the ditches, but a
major concern is who pays for the im-
provements. Phillips said assessments
in the 1930s were not always consis-
tent, and some landowners reaped the
benefit and were never assessed, while
others paid a larger share.
“We’re redoing the system,” Phillips
said, and that includes determining
who benefits from the improvements
and what their share of the costs will
be.
The BCWD Board has the taxing
authority and can assess costs to any-
one who benefits from the ditch im-
provements.
Phillips said there is not a huge
amount of change in the amount of
runoff from 40 years ago, but what has
changed is how it runs off. There are
faster spikes in water runoff in recent
years, and in the ways the water is con-
veyed to Buffalo Creek.
He said a three-eighths-inch rain in
a day can drain off from a piece of
ground quickly, but if the ground is al-
ready saturated, an inch rain could
take five days to drain from that same
land.
BCWD’s role in water runoff came
to the forefront in the early 1990s,
when historic flooding caused Glen-
coe, among others, to look at compre-
hensive ways to prevent future flood-
ing. Millions of dollars in improve-
ments over the past 25 years have
helped in Glencoe, but haven’t elimi-
nated wide-spread flooding.
In the 1990s into early 2000s, resi-
dential growth added to the runoff
pressures, and BCWD required new
developments have retention or hold-
ing ponds to slow down the runoff
water to the creek.
“They have helped,” Phillips said of
the retention ponds, many on the
north end of Glencoe.
But with the 2013 and 2014 floods,
the huge deluge of rain in both events
simply overpowered Glencoe’s ability
to drain it away. Both flooding events
indicated there is still a long way to go
to address the flooding concerns.
“There is always a tussle,” Phillips
said, when farmers or cities “want
water gone right away.” He admitted
the flooding rains of 2013 and 2014 in
Glencoe simply were too large to be
handled by any drainage system avail-
able at the time.
Other changes come in the form of
government mandates on water con-
trol and water quality, often without
additional funding. Future unfunded
mandates include expensive upgrades
to control phosphorus from getting
into lakes and rivers. The mandates
are for upgrades to municipal treat-
ment plants, but that doesn’t address
possible phosphorus runoff from farm
fields.
Buffers along waterways are one op-
tion to prevent the chemical runoff,
and Phillips stressed the need for farm-
ers to “not farm fence line to fence
line.”
BCWD deals with hot topic — water
Larry Phillips
AG SCENE - 22 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
Hutchinson Co-op agronomist are here to help you with all your needs.
Comprehensive Precision Ag Program · Crop input fnancing
Variable Rate Spreading · Soil Sampling · Grid Sampling
Custom application of fertilizer
Asgrow/Dekalb · Croplan Genetics · NK Brand · Wensman
WAYNE MAIERS
LUKE HENNING MITCH FABEL
90836 AG
HUTCHINSON
1420 ADAM ST.
320-587-3229
ARLINGTON
23189 HWY. 5
507-964-2283
LESTER PRAIRIE
122 BABCOCK AVE.
320-395-2576
You have to wonder about all the hys-
teria about genetically modified organ-
isms (GMOs) and what it’s based on.
I’ve talked with crop specialists, and
they say that scientists
have been manipulat-
ing genes in plants for
hundreds, if not thou-
sands, of years.
New varieties of
fruits and vegetables,
new corn and soybean
hybrids, disease resist-
ant wheat...so many
have come from simply
crossing species in the
field. And that crossing
has changed the original plant to a new
one.
Even nature crosses genes through an-
imal cross breeding, plants crossing nat-
urally to form something new and some
plants live and some die based on how
hardy they are.
So the entire concept of changing
plants and animals is nothing new, but
you would never know it by the anti-
GMO activists.
Even Chipotle has announced it will
not use GMO food in
its restaurants. The
crazy thing is that
GMOs are changing
things for the better in
many cases.
Would you rather
have sweet corn with
a bacillus thuringienis
(BT) gene in it that
does not have to be
sprayed, or a conven-
tional that has to be
sprayed weekly?
Well, that’s a choice people can make.
I have no problem with GMO free food,
it’s all about choice. But choice is the
key, not force feeding anything to peo-
ple.
GMOs or no GMOs
Lynn Ketelsen
Lynn Ketelson is the Farm Director
for Linder Farm Network.
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 23 - AG SCENE
in the McLeod County Chronicle
and the Arlington Enterprise.
2
m
o
n
th
s fre
e
w
ith
o
n
e
ye
a
r
su
b
sc
rip
tio
n
!
Ag Subscription Offer 2016 - 2 months free - Choose one of the following papers:
Name ____________________________________________
Mailing Address ____________________________________
_________________________________________________
Phone ____________________________________________
Ì Check Enclosed Ì Bill my credit card Ìi Ìr ÌaÌq Charge acct.# ________________________________Exp. date_________
MAIL IN THE FORM BELOW: P.O. Box 188, Glencoe, MN 55336; OR CALL 320-864-5518 TO ORDER!
Ì M.C. Chronicle
Please include the correct payment amount:
•McLeod Co. & New Auburn Addresses:
$
39
•Other MN Addresses:
$
45
•Addresses Outside MN:
$
51
Ì A. Enterprise
Please include the correct payment amount:
•MN Addresses:
$
37
•Addresses Outside MN:
$
43
CERTIFIED ORGANIC NON-GMO
FEEDS AND GRAINS
Chick Starter & Grower Available NOW!
SOLD IN 50 POUND BAGS
Soy Free feeds are available.
We stock Turkey, Layer, Sheep, Goat, Hog, etc.
www.organicfeedstore.com
Serving Organic Farmers since 1997
HAMBURG, MN
952-467-3209
Pickup by Appointment
Alsleben Livestock Trucking
Adam and Wanda Alsleben, owners — Over 32 years experience
• Runs made daily to Haas Livestock & O & S Cattle •
• Weekly runs to Zumbrota & Custom Hauling •
Contract prices available on cattle of 20 head or more
“I have buyers for steers and cows.” Guaranteed price on farm with no commissions!
Phone 320-864-4509 Cell 320-510-1392
Farmers just don’t receive the credit
due for the conservation efforts they
make. It seems that few in state or feder-
al government really realize just how
much farmers have
done to preserve the
soil and water through
many different proj-
ects.
From grass water-
ways to terraces to
buffer strips to wet-
lands, the list goes on
and on with projects
farmers have done to
protect their farms.
And why not; that land
and water is their
livelihood.
But, as with anything, most times peo-
ple don’t really see what is being done
and, in this case, few are actually aware.
I have attended the state soil and
water conservation meetings many
times, and I am absolutely amazed at
just how much farm-
ers do.
In many cases there
is no cost sharing, just
farmers who want to
do the right thing.
And most don’t do it
for glory, they do it
because they care.
That’s what I see for
conservation efforts.
Are there excep-
tions? Sure, just like
anything. But the vast
majority care and do the right thing.
Farmers are true
conservationists
Lynn Ketelsen
Lynn Ketelson is the Farm Director
for Linder Farm Network.
AG SCENE - 24 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
Your business needs a
Web site.
We can create one for you.
*Domain name purchase not included. A one time set-up fee will apply.
Call today to set up your free consultation, 320-864-5518!
McLeod Publishing, Inc.
The McLeod County Chronicle • The Galaxy • The Glencoe Advertiser
The Sibley Shopper • Arlington Enterprise
Visit us at McPubDesigns.com
Call today to set up your free consultation, 320-864-5518!
McLeod Publishing, Inc.
The McLeod County Chronicle • The Galaxy • The Glencoe Advertiser
The Sibley Shopper • Arlington Enterprise
Visit us at McPubDesigns.com
What else can we do for you?
• Logo Design • Business Cards • Flyers • Letterheads
• Brochures • Company Envelopes • Banners • Posters
• Full-Color Copies • Newspaper Ads • Raffle Tickets • Receipts
• Gift Certificates • Facebook Pages • Postcards
Need something not listed? Don’t hesitate to ask!
Starting at
just
$
15/mo
*
From a small shop to a
budget!
to your exact needs and
post-frame building
can custom build your
large machine shed, we
Built on your level site. MN Lic #BC048615 Built on your level site. MN Lic #BC048615
Engine
Rebuilding & Machining
of all types
Schwarzrock Motors
Cale Schwarzrock, Owner
Cale_Schwarzrock@Hotmail.com
320-510-0490
200 Main St. E.
Silver Lake, MN
Custom Baling
Big Square 3’x3’
Round 4’x6’
• Wrapper &
Teder Rental
Available
JD’s
Custom Baling
cell 507-317-5522
call for appointment
leave message
#####################
#####################
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 25 - AG SCENE
T
h
a
n
k
s
TO ALL OF THOSE WHO TRUSTED
US TO BUILD THE BEST POSSIBLE!
C
a
ll u
s for
a
ll you
r bu
ild
ing
need
s!
FULL
SERVICE
LUM
BER
COM
PANY
We Stand
Strong...
www.4squarebuilders.com
Designing, Bidding and Building All in One Since 1979.
Preston Fox ~ Gary Gehring
Fairfax Glencoe Waconia
507.426.8206 320.864.6183 952.442.3390
4square@embarqmail.com for all construction answers
License #2378
Terry Jones
(320) 864-5581
Ron Molstad
(320) 864-1603
Ben Beckman
(320) 864-1602
Contact Terry, Ron or Ben today!
• Paint & Supplies
• Farm Supplies
• Carhartt
• Power Tools
• Sporting Goods
• Automotive
• Seasonal Items
• Farm Gates &
Feeders
• Pet Supplies
• Animal Feed
• Electrical Supplies
• Plumbing Supplies
• Toys
• Housewares
• Clothing & Boots
• Propane
• Fishing Licenses
Hwy 212, 3105 10
th
St. E., Glencoe • Next to Shopko
320-864-4304
Mon.–Fri. 8 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Since 1905
lnms@embarqmail.com
Virgil • Lynn
Glencoe, Minnesota
320-864-4453
• Club Lambs
• Breeding
Stock
Locally Owned & Operated Since 1959
Downtown Hutchinson
320-587-8356
COUPON
13% OFF
Storewide On Any
Footwear Purchase
ON ANY REG. PRICED FOOTWEAR
Not valid with other offers.
Expires 4/30/16
• Dansko
• Keen
• Redwing
• SAS
• New Balance
• Clark
• Hush Puppies
• Rockport
• Powerstep
Orthotics
AG SCENE - 26 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 27 - AG SCENE
426 1
st
Ave. SE, Hutchinson
320-587-9656
35473 US Hwy. 212, Olivia
320-523-5682
2-WAY RADIO SALES & SERVICE
1320 Pryor Ave.
Glencoe
320-864-6222
575 Jefferson St.
Hutchinson
320-234-9690
Let Mike & Lyle
handle all your car care needs.
See Us for
COMPLETE AUTO CARE
• Oil Changes • Engine Diagnostic •
• Electrical • Tune-Ups •
• Transmissions • Brakes •
• Exhaust • Struts & Shocks •
• Fuel Injection • Tire Sales & Service •
T
h
e
B
e
st S
h
o
p
in
th
e
A
re
a
With input from its family-farmer-
based membership, Minnesota Farm-
ers Union (MFU) has shared some of
its top key issues that they are looking
at for the 2016 legislative session.
“We will be clearly setting our prior-
ities over the next month, but do have
some top issues that are concerning us
and family farmers throughout Min-
nesota,” said Doug Peterson, MFU
President. “MFU will work with the
Dayton Administration and legislators
to find common-sense solutions to ad-
dress key issues such as buffers, prop-
erty taxes, farmer-lender mediation
and transportation.”
A few top issues that are affecting
family farmers and Minnesota Farmers
Union are:
- Claify new buffer rules: What wa-
ters are included? What are the “alter-
native” practices allowed? What is the
appeal process for disputes? What
compensation is available? What is the
impact on property taxes for buffered
land?
- Property tax relief: With a nearly
$1 billion surplus, MFU has been seek-
ing property tax relief for ag land.
Specifically, MFU has been working to
lower the amount farmers pay for cap-
ital improvement levies for schools.
- Extend farmer-lender mediation:
This popular program is used by thou-
sands of farmers every year and is set
to sunset this year if the legislature
does not extend the program. MFU
feels that, with low commodity prices,
this is an important program for farm-
ers. MFU also supports extending the
program at its current threshold of
$5,000.
-Transportation funding: While
MFU would support a modest increase
in the gas tax, that is unlikely to hap-
pen; MFU also supports a strong
bonding package for local roads and
bridges.
These are just some of the issues
MFU will be working on in the 2016
legislative session. Also, these are the
issues MFU members will be talking to
legislators about when they head to the
state capitol for their annual lobby
day.
MFU states key issues
for legislative session
Slow-cooked whiskey-
molasses shredded beef
Ingredients
1 beef Bottom Round Roast or beef Chuck Center Roast (2 1/2 to 3
pounds), cut into 1-inch pieces
1/2 cup whiskey
1/4 cup plus 2 Tbsp cider
vinegar
1 (6 ounce can) tomato paste
4 Tbsp packed brown sugar,
divided
1/4 cup molasses
1-1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp ground red pepper
1 Tbsp Dijon-style mustard
2 cups each shredded carrots and diced granny smith apple
Preparation
Place roast in 4-1/2 to 5-1/2 quart slow cooker. Combine whiskey, 1/4 cup
vinegar, tomato paste, 2 tablespoons brown sugar, molasses, salt and pepper;
pour over roast. Cover and cook on HIGH 4 to 6 hours or on LOW 8 to 10
hours, or until beef is, fork-tender.
Remove roast from slow cooker; shred with 2 forks. Skim fat from sauce as
needed. Return beef to slow cooker.
To make the slaw: Combine remaining 2 tablespoons cider vinegar, 2 table-
spoons brown sugar and mustard in large bowl. Add carrots and apples; mix
well. Season with salt and black pepper as desired. Refrigerate until ready to
serve. Serve beef with slaw.
*Thinly sliced pears, celery, red cabbage, green cabbage or bell peppers, or a
pre-packaged slaw mix can be used in place of the carrots or apples.
AG SCENE - 28 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
www.henslinauctions.com
M I N N ESOTA STATE AUCTIONEERS ASSOCIAT I O N
A S S O C I A T I O N
N O R T H D A K O T A
Henslin Auctions, Inc.
(320) 365-4120
Bird Island, MN
LaDon Henslin 65-25
Allen Henslin
Cell: (320) 979-1808
Frank Roering
(320) 290-8490
Brad Dallmann
(320) 905-6226
We have buyers for your
Land and Equipment!
www.henslinauctions.com
Watch for more farm, construction equipment, real estate and land auctions!
MADISON, MN
RAYMOND BJORNSON ESTATE
GROVE CITY, MN
LOGAN PAUTZKE, OWNER
UPPER RED LAKE/
KELLIHER, MN
GREAT MN RENTAL
LAKE LILLIAN, MN
NORDIN ACRES, OWNERS
BUFFALO LAKE, MN
AREA FARMERS,
CONTRACTORS & DEALERS
WASECA, MN
ALBANY, MN
ALBANY FARM EQUIPMENT,
JOHN PETERNELL, OWNER
ALBANY, MN
ALBANY FARM EQUIPMENT,
JOHN PETERNELL, OWNER
CLARA CITY, MN
WAYNE HARGUTH ESTATE
MONTEVIDEO, MN
AMERICAN SURPLUS & MFG
MONTEVIDEO, MN
RONALD & DIANNE SHEROD
OLIVIA, MN
GERALD LIPPERT ESTATE
BROWNTON, MN
WALLACE GROCHOW ESTATE
MARIETTA, MN
R.F. CLARK CO.
HECTOR, MN
THE RUSSELL JOHNSON LIFETIME
ANTIQUE TRACTOR COLLECTION
OLIVIA, MN
DAVE & ANN FANK
BIRD ISLAND, MN
DICK & NORMA EILER
BUFFALO LAKE, MN
AREA FARMERS,
CONTRACTORS & DEALERS
KANDIYOHI, MN
RON & HELEN HENNES
ATWATER, MN
MARGARET LORENSEN, OWNER
BIRD ISLAND, MN
JONATHAN ROKER ESTATE
Our professional service includes:
Professional auctioneers and support staff,
equipment loading/unloading assistance,
portable loading dock, modern lighted
secure auction facility, extensive advertising,
marketing, promotion and guaranteed
payment to seller. Sellers, take advantage of
our large exclusive email campaign.
THINKING OF HAVING AN AUCTION?
WE WANT TO BE YOUR AUCTION COMPANY!
320-365-4120 º 3ll8n@h8n8lln3UCtlCn8.CCm
NOIIT A I CCI
OOC
S SSS
AAS
S RRS EER EEE NNE O I T C U AAU E
MAD MA SO DI , S , ON N MADISON, MN M
Y 1 OPENS - THURS, FEBRUAR RY
- G N I S O L C S T RT A TTA S º . M . A 0 0 . 0 1
FEB 25TH, 2016, 10:00 A.M.
TE EQUIPMENT A Y EST TA TIMED ONLINE ONL
AUCTION
ARM AND CONSTR Y CLEAN FFA VER R
: EQUIPMENT
CLEAN LOW HR JOHN DEERE 7320R MFWD
Y 18, 2016,
, . S R U H T -
FEB 25TH, 2016, 10:00 A.M.
TE EQUIPMENT
ARM AND CONSTRUCTION
CLEAN LOW HR JOHN DEERE 7320R MFWD
OOOLI OLI
Y , MA AY YY, TUESDA AY
TRACTORS, VEHICLES, TOOLS, F
TED ITEMS, A RELA AT
MUCH MORE....
GERALD LIPPER
T 0 7 3 8 0 5 3 7
ROW B OW R BROW O
A, V , IA N VIA, MN M
Y 10, 2016, 11:00 A.M.
ARM HICLES, TOOLS, F FA
TED ITEMS, ANTIQUE FURNITURE AND
MUCH MORE....
TE A T EST TA GERALD LIPPER
N M , A l v l | O º . TT. S H
WN NTO WN N TOO N WNTON MN M
A D S E U T
AA
NN
TT O K A D H
O I T A I C
T
O
Auction
y
M k i k g
d
Today’s
dvantage
Marketing
OLI A, V , IA N OLIVIA, MN M
. M . A 0 0 . 9 , 6 1 0 2 , 9 T S U G U A , YY, AAY
CLEAN LOW HR JOHN DEERE 7320R MFWD
TRACTOR, JD 4020 SIDE CONSOLE PS -
Y RESTORED, EXCA COMPLETEL LY
VICE TRUCKS, AC WD TRACTOR, SER
TED I TILLAGE & OTHER RELA AT
YMOND BJORNSON EST RA
N O S l D A M º E v AAv T S 1 9 1 7 3 6 1
ROOV G VE ROVE ROV OV TY C Y I , TY N , MN M YY GROVE CITYYYY,
0 . 1 1 , 6 1 0 2 , 3 H C R A M , S R U H T
ARM LAND AUC MEEKER CO. F FA
TED IN SECT 78.12 ACRES LOCA AT
-120-N, R , TT- SWEDE GROVE TWP P,
MEEKER CO.
VEYED! LAND HAS BEEN SUR
AR ROAD ACCES HWY 12 T TA
CLEAN LOW HR JOHN DEERE 7320R MFWD
TRACTOR, JD 4020 SIDE CONSOLE PS -
TOR, AAT VVA AAV
VICE TRUCKS, AC WD TRACTOR,
TED ITEMS
TE A TTA
N M , N
M . A 0 0
ARM LAND AUCTION
TED IN SECTION 35,
, -120-N, R-32-W
VEYED!
AR ROAD ACCESS!
ALLBBA A AN AL NY LBA A , ANY Y ALBANYYYYY,
0 2 , T S 1 L I R P A , YY, AAY D I R F
Y ALBANY HUGE TWO DA
ARM EQUIPMENT FFA
RETIREMENT AUCTION
Y ONE OF HUGE 2 D DA AY
LARGE AMOUNT OF COLLECTIBLE
EQUIPMENT & ANTIQUE ITEMS, TOOLS,
ACHMENTS & REL TTTA AAT
COLLECTED FROM OVER 60 YEARS IN THE
ARM EQUIPMENT FFA
ARM EQ ALBANY F FA
N MN M
. M . A 0 3 . 8 , 6 1 0
, MN LBANY Y,
ARM EQUIPMENT DEALER
RETIREMENT AUCTION
Y AUCTION: DA AY
LARGE AMOUNT OF COLLECTIBLE
EQUIPMENT & ANTIQUE ITEMS, TOOLS,
TED ITEMS LAAT
COLLECTED FROM OVER 60 YEARS IN THE
ARM EQUIPMENT BUSINESS
QUIPMENT T,
ROOW B W RO BROW ROW
A M , YY, AAY D S R U H T
LARGE EST
TRACTORS, VEHICLES, TOOLS,
T ARM RELA AT FFA
ARE, ANTIQUE FURNITU RE AND GLASSW
MUCH MORE....
ALLACE G WWA
WNTTO WWNT N, T , TON N WNTON, MN M
. M . A 0 0 . 0 1 , 6 1 0 2 , 9 1 Y AAY
TE AUCTION A ST TA
TRACTORS, VEHICLES, TOOLS,
TED ITEMS, UNIQUE
ARE, ANTIQUE FURNITU RE AND
MUCH MORE....
TE A GROCHOWEST TA
ARM EQU FFA
MF 8250 MFWD TRACTOR - 4,600 HRS, MF
8160 MFWD TRACTOR - 2,800 HRS, MF
8570 COMBINE, JD 7300 12R30” PLANTER,
30’ CASE IH 4800 FIELD CUL
444 TRACTOR, GRAIN TRUCKS, AUGERS,
GRAIN DR
MISC SHOP TOOLS, P
7 6 7 8
BB
A , S E U T
ARM E FFA
TRACTORS, COMBINE & HEADS, TILLAGE
ARM EQUIPMENT RETIREMENT AUCTION
MF 8250 MFWD TRACTOR - 4,600 HRS, MF
8160 MFWD TRACTOR - 2,800 HRS, MF
8570 COMBINE, JD 7300 12R30” PLANTER,
TOR, MH AAT TIV VA IH 4800 FIELD CUL LT
444 TRACTOR, GRAIN TRUCKS, AUGERS,
TS, YER ON TRANSPOR N DR R
TS & SUPPLIES AR OP TOOLS, P PA
ANK VE & ANN F FA DA
N M , A l v l | O º . T S H T 0 3 3 5 7
RD B RD IR LA I N SL D, A D, ND N BIRD ISLAND, MN M
. M . A 0 0 . 0 1 , 6 1 0 2 , 6 1 T S U G U A
RETIREMENT AUCTION EQUIP P.
TRACTORS, COMBINE & HEADS, TILLAGE
AR ROAD ACCES HWY 12 T TA
AUTZKE, OWNE LOGAN PPA
UP R P RE E D R LA RE KKE LA UPPER RED LAKE KKE
KE L KKELLI R, H R, ER N KELLIHER, MN M
0 0 . 1 1 , 6 1 0 2 , 5 H C R A M , TT, AAT S
15+ ICE CASTLE FISH HOUSES, V
MODELS, SIZES AND OPTIONS, LOADED,
SOME UNITS WILL BE NEW AND SOME
DEMO UNITS. ALSO SELLING ICE FISHING
TTLE REELS, ROD HOLDERS SUPPLIES: RA
& ICE HOLE LINERS
AL T MN RENT TA GREA
’S BEACH ROAD 21494 JOA
KELLIHER, MN 56650
AR ROAD ACCESS!
AUTZKE, OWNER
////
. M . A
ARIOUS VVA
MODELS, SIZES AND OPTIONS, LOADED,
SOME UNITS WILL BE NEW AND SOME
DEMO UNITS. ALSO SELLING ICE FISHING
TTLE REELS, ROD HOLDERS
’S BEACH ROAD
ARM EQ ALBANY F FA
JOHN PETERNELL, OWNER
ALLBBA A AN AL NY LBA A , ANY Y ALBANYYYYY,
2 , 2 L I R P A , YY, AAY D R U T AAT S
Y ALBANY HUGE TWO DA
ARM EQUIPMENT FFA
RETIREMENT AUCTION
Y TWO OF HUGE 2 D DA AY
COMPLETE RETIREMENT LIQUIDA
AUCTION INCLUDING TO DA
TRACTORS, 54 PLOWS, 44 FIELD
TORS, 52 DISCS AAT TIV VA CUL LT
, FEEDER W EQUIPMENT
TRUCKS, TRAILERS,
FORK LIFTS, LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT
, QUIPMENT T,
JOHN PETERNELL, OWNER
N MN M
. M . A 0 3 . 8 , 6 1 0 2
, MN LBANY Y,
ARM EQUIPMENT DEALER
RETIREMENT AUCTION
Y AUCTION: DA AY
TION NT LIQUIDA AT
TE: 61 TO DAAT
TRACTORS, 54 PLOWS, 44 FIELD
Y & FORAGE , HA AY
AGONS, R W WA
TRUCKS, TRAILERS,
FORK LIFTS, LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT
MARRI MARI A MARI R
L U J , YY, AAY D S R U H T
AI WELL MAINT TA
EQUIPMENT RETIREMENT AUCTION
W JD 9650 STS R
CASE IH 170 FW
9680 4WD, JD 4555, IH 806, SEMIS &
HOPPER BOTTOMS, DR
HANDLING EQUIPMENT
CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT
. C R.F F.
4 Y WW H 3 2 2 1
TT I A E A, T , AA N A, MN M TT IETT TA TA
. M . A 0 0 . 0 1 , 6 1 0 2 , 4 1 Y LLY
ARM & CONST T. INED F FA
EQUIPMENT RETIREMENT AUCTION
A COMBINE & HEADS, WWA
TILE A, FORD VERSA AT WWA
9680 4WD, JD 4555, IH 806, SEMIS &
YER & GRAIN OMS, DR RY
ARM & , FFA QUIPMENT,
CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT
. CLARK CO.
N M , A TTA T E l R A M º 0 4
AND F
DICK & NORMA EILER
3 7 4 1 0 8
U BU B
, S R U H T
LARGE EQUIPMENT AUCTION!
TE MO LAAT
TRUCKS, TRAILERS, CONSTRUCTION
EQUIPMENT
ITEMS & MUCH MORE!!!
CALL TODA
CONTRACTORS & DEALERS
ARM EQUIPMENT AND F FA
DICK & NORMA EILER
N M , D N A | S l D R l B º . TT. S H T 0 8 3
A U AL F LO ALO A LA ALO AKKE L E, A , AKKE N ALO LAKE MN M F UFF
. M . A 0 0 . 9 , 6 1 0 2 , 8 1 T S U G U A ,
LARGE EQUIPMENT AUCTION!
TE MODEL TRACTORS, COMBINES,
TRUCKS, TRAILERS, CONSTRUCTION
, FISH HOUSES, BRAND NEW NT,
ITEMS & MUCH MORE!!!
Y TO MARKET YOUR ITEMS! DAAY
(320) 365-4120
ARMERS, AREA F FA
CONTRACTORS & DEALERS
AKKE L AK LI A L N L , IA , A N MN M N ILLIAN L KE AKE LL
0 . 1 1 , 6 1 0 2 , 6 1 H C R A M , D E W
ARM LAND A PRIME KANDIYOHI CO. FFA
170 ACRES MORE OR LESS LOCA
SECTION 30, EAST LAKE LILLIAN TWP
KANDIYOHI COUNTY!
VEYED! LAND HAS BEEN SUR
TING = 91 .I. SOIL RA AT C.P
VE NEVER SUGAR BEETS HA AV
PRODUCED ON THIS LAND!
NORDIN ACRES, OWNERS
B A U L F O A O A LA LO AKE L , A , AK M E ALO LAKE, M F BUFF
0 . 9 , 6 1 0 2 , 7 1 H C R A M , S R U H T
LARGE EQUIPMENT AUCTION!
NN
M . A 0
ARM LAND AUCTION
TED IN CAAT
, AN TWP P,
VEYED!
VE NEVER BEEN
PRODUCED ON THIS LAND!
NORDIN ACRES, OWNERS
N MN M
. M . A 0 0
LARGE EQUIPMENT AUCTION!
FORK LIFTS, LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT
& MUCH MORE
ARM EQ ALBANY F FA
JOHN PETERNELL, OWNER
LA C RA L RA AARA TY C Y I CLARA CITY TY
T 2 , 4 1 L I R P A , YY, AAY D S R U H
A CLEAN WELL MAINT TA
, ANTIQUE/ EQUIPMENT,
TRACTORS, COMMERCIAL GRADE WOOD
WORKING EQUIPMENT
WMILL ON TRANSPOR SA
TOYS AND OTHER GOOD CLEAN ITEMS
YNE HARGUTH EST A WWA
NT MO EV NTE D V DE I MONTEVIDE D
FORK LIFTS, LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT
& MUCH MORE
, QUIPMENT T,
JOHN PETERNELL, OWNER
, N , MN M YYYYYY,
. M . A 0 0 . 9 , 6 1 0 2
ARM AINED F FA
, ANTIQUE/COLLECTIBLE
TRACTORS, COMMERCIAL GRADE WOOD
, PMENT,
, T, WMILL ON TRANSPOR
TOYS AND OTHER GOOD CLEAN ITEMS
TE A H EST TA
O N O MN M
KANDIYOHI, MN
A , D E W
CLEAN LA
RETIREMENT AUCTION
AUCTION HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE:
2012 JD 8335 R
2002 JD 8120 MFWD TRACTOR, 2,300 HRS;
WD COMBINE, CONTOUR MASTER; JD 9610 R
2013 JD 2210, 38.5’ FIELD CUL
KAAN KA KAAN YO D O IYO YO , OHI N KANDIYOHI MN M
. M . A 0 3 . 0 1 , 6 1 0 2 , 1 3 T S U G U A
ARM EQUIPMENT TE MODEL F FA CLEAN LA
RETIREMENT AUCTION
AUCTION HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE:
T TRACTOR, 500 HRS; D 8335 R
2002 JD 8120 MFWD TRACTOR, 2,300 HRS;
WD COMBINE, CONTOUR MASTER;
O C
TE MODEL TRACTORS, COM LA AT
, TRUCKS, ARM & TILLAGE EQUIPMENT FFA
TRAILERS, CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT
TIONAL FISH HOUSES, RECREA AT
TOOLS, BRAND NEW ITEMS
& MUCH MUCH MORE!!!
Y TO MARKET YOUR CALL TODA AY
(320) 365-4120
ARMERS, AREA F FA
CONTRACTORS & DEALERS
AAS A EC A CA AS A, EC , CAA N ASECA MN M WWWW
0 0 . 9 , 6 1 0 2 , 6 2 H C R A M T AAT S
THE COMPLETE CLOSEOUT OF
T & HOME TED LUMBER MAR ASSOCIA
TE MODEL TRACTORS, COMBINES,
, TRUCKS,
, UIPMENT,
TIONAL ITEMS,
TOOLS, BRAND NEW ITEMS
& MUCH MUCH MORE!!!
Y TO MARKET YOUR ITEMS!
CONTRACTORS & DEALERS
. M . A
THE COMPLETE CLOSEOUT OF
T & HOME
NT MO V NT V TEV DDE I MONTEVIDE D
2 , 0 3 L I R P A , YY, AAY D R U T AAT S
LARGE ANNUAL SPRING
INVENTORY REDUCTION AUCTION
DEMOED & USED ICE CASTLE FISH HOUSE,
ABLE STORA TTA NEW POR
TOOLS, FURNITURE, CARPET & FLOORING,
ICE FISHING SUPPLIES, BUILDING
SUPPLIES & MUCH MORE....
AMERICAN SURPLUS & MFG
NT MO EV NT TEV D V DE I MONTEVIDE D
1 0 2 , 3 Y AAY M , YY, AAY D S E U T
CAMARO, GM PICKUP
ACHMENTS, QUALIT TTTA AAT
FURNISHINGS, NEWER W
O, O, O N O, MN M
. M . A 0 0 . 0 1 , 6 1 0 2
LARGE ANNUAL SPRING
INVENTORY REDUCTION AUCTION
DEMOED & USED ICE CASTLE FISH HOUSE,
ABLE STORAGE BUILDINGS,
TOOLS, FURNITURE, CARPET & FLOORING,
ICE FISHING SUPPLIES, BUILDING
SUPPLIES & MUCH MORE....
AMERICAN SURPLUS & MFG
O, O, O N O, MN M
. M . A 0 0 . 1 1 , 6 1
, 8N FORD & PP,
ACHMENTS, QUALITY HOUSEHOLD
YER ASHER & DR RY FURNISHINGS, NEWER WASHER & DR
EC C HHEC EC
T S U G U A , TT, AAT S
150+ ANTIQUE & 2-CYLINDER
TRACTORS, MANY RARE & HARD TO FIND
MINNEAPOLIS MOLINE, FORD,
FORDSON TRACTORS & CRA
WITH LOW SERIAL NUMBERS.
A ALSO SELLING P PA
TRACTORS, HORSE DRA
MUCH MORE
THE RUSSELL JOHNSON LIFETIME
ANTIQUE TRACTOR COLLECTION
CTO CT R, TOR, OR N TOR, MN M
. M . A 0 0 . 9 , 6 1 0 2 , 6 T
150+ ANTIQUE & 2-CYLINDER
TRACTORS, MANY RARE & HARD TO FIND
MINNEAPOLIS MOLINE, FORD,
WLERS FORDSON TRACTORS & CRA
WITH LOW SERIAL NUMBERS.
TS, MANUALS, PEDAL AR
WN EQUIPMENT & TRACTORS, HORSE DRA
MUCH MORE
THE RUSSELL JOHNSON LIFETIME
ANTIQUE TRACTOR COLLECTION
2013 JD 2210, 38.5’ FIELD CUL
2013 JD MODEL 200, 39.5’ CRUMBLER;
2004 JD 1710, 18R22” PLANTER;
RON & HELEN HENNES
, NOVEMBER 1, 2016, 11:00 A.M Y TUESDA AY
KANDIYOHI CO. F
72 ACRES LOCA
HARRISON TWP
LAND HAS BEEN SUR
HWY 12 T
MARGARET LORENSEN, OWNER
TOR; AAT TIVVA 2210, 38.5’ FIELD CUL LT
2013 JD MODEL 200, 39.5’ CRUMBLER;
2004 JD 1710, 18R22” PLANTER;
MANY BOUGHT NEW!
RON & HELEN HENNES
ATWA TT AT R, T R, ER N TER MN M AAAA WWW TW AAA
, NOVEMBER 1, 2016, 11:00 A.M
ARM LAND AUCTION OHI CO. F FA
TED IN SECTION 36, RES LOCA AT
, -120-N, R-33-W , TT- ISON TWP P,
KANDIYOHI CO.
VEYED! LAND HAS BEEN SUR
AR ROAD ACCESS! WY 12 T TA
MARGARET LORENSEN, OWNER
ASECA, MN
e auctions, complete listings, online bidding, thousands of photos, and other auction information, visit us at: For mor
DESIGN OF W WA
Y BOX TRUCKS, BOOM T DELIVER RY
FORKLIFTS,
LULL TELE-HANDLER, LUMBER,
TION, DOORS & WIND INSULA AT
ALL, FLOORING, BUILD YWWA DR RY
ARE, O TERIALS & HARDW WA MA AT
EQUIPMENT AND BRAND NEW ITEMS.
TION: AUCTION LOCA AT
A O E S A WWA º E v AAv N W O R B 0 0 1 2
ASECA, MN
e auctions, complete listings, online bidding, thousands of photos, and other auction information, visit us at:
Y BOX TRUCKS, BOOM TRUCKS,
LULL TELE-HANDLER, LUMBER,
TION, DOORS & WINDOWS,
ALL, FLOORING, BUILDING
ARE, OFFICE
EQUIPMENT AND BRAND NEW ITEMS.
N M , A
FURNISHINGS, NEWER W
ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES,
TOOLS, SHOP ITEMS,
WN & GARDEN EQUIPMENT LA
RONALD & DIANNE SHEROD
VE 2045 90TH A AV
MONTEVIDEO, MN 56265
THINKING OF HAVING AN AUCTION?
AUCTION R OU BE Y TO WANT WE
n 8 h @ n 8 l l 3 º 0 2 1 4 - 5 6 3 - 0 2 3
YER,
e auctions, complete listings, online bidding, thousands of photos, and other auction information, visit us at:
ASHER & DR RY WA
ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES,
TOOLS, SHOP ITEMS,
WN & GARDEN EQUIPMENT
RONALD & DIANNE SHEROD
. VE. S.W
MONTEVIDEO, MN 56265
ANTIQUE TRACTOR COLLECTION
N H O J | | E S S Ü R
Our professiona p
auctioneers Professional
loading/unloading equipment
loading portable
facility auction secure
promotion marketing,
Sellers, . seller to payment
lusive our large exc
THINKING OF HAVING AN AUCTION?
Y! AN MP CO AUCTION
m C C . 8 n C l t C U 3 n l l 8
ANTIQUE TRACTOR COLLECTION
e auctions, complete listings, online bidding, thousands of photos, and other auction information, visit us at: www
4 5 4 8 - 2 1 2 - 0 2 3 º N O S N
BB
WED, NOVEMBER 30, 2016, 10:00 A.M.
AR CLEAN FFA
JD 9750 STS COMBINE, 690/489 HRS;
JD 8130 MFWD TRACTOR, 1897 HRS,
SEMI TRUCKS, TIMPTE GRAIN TRAILER,
ARKER PPA
TILLAGE EQUIPMENT AND MUCH MORE....
JONA
al service includes:
staff, support and auctioneers
assistance, loading/unloading
lighted modern dock,
advertising, extensive , facility
guaranteed and promotion
of ge advanta take Sellers,
email campaign.
.henslinauctions.com www
RD B RD IR LA I N SL D, A D, ND N BIRD ISLAND, MN M
WED, NOVEMBER 30, 2016, 10:00 A.M.
TE AUCTION A RM EQUIPMENT ESTTA
JD 9750 STS COMBINE, 690/489 HRS;
JD 8130 MFWD TRACTOR, 1897 HRS,
SEMI TRUCKS, TIMPTE GRAIN TRAILER,
ARM AND VITY BOXES, F FA R GRAAV
TILLAGE EQUIPMENT AND MUCH MORE....
TE A THAN ROKER EST TA JONA
2016AG
SCENE
Section 2
FEBRUARY
27 & 28, 2016
A special supplement to The Renville County Shopper & The Glencoe Advertiser
MCPA offers energy
efficiency options
to farmers p.5
Farmer
switched
acreage to
strip tillage
p.9
Ag Plastic:
McLeod County may
become a hubp.13
www.GlencoeNews.com,
click on Special Sections
Go Online
to viewthis
section!
212 Seed & Ag:
A new company, years
of experience p.19
Brought to you by McLeod County and Nicollet/Sibley County Corn & Soybean Growers and their checkofs.
In 2015, Minnesota farmers enrolled more than 1 million acres in the Conservation
Reserve Program, giving Minnesota one of the highest rates of enrollment in the nation.
Protecting resources. Preserving a legacy.
Find out more about what Minnesota corn and soybean farmers are doing today
to ensure a healthy, safe and productive environment for years to come.
Visit mncorn.org or mnsoybean.org
Source: USDA
AG SCENE - 30 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
FuII Time TraiIer SaIes & Repair
CompIete Line of TraiIer Parts
2 Miles West ol Renville on Hwy 212
www.renvillesales.com
Hours: M-F 8 am-5 pm · Sat. 8:30 am-12 pm
or call lor appointment
Skid Loader Attachments
Material Fork Grapple Skid Loader Attachments
NEW & USED TRAILERS IN STOCK
SPECIAL ORDERS & TRADE-INS
NO PROBLEM!
DLR35836
ƣe棣W ƣe棣W
£æc£wæeæ £æc£wæeæ
Zvæ¿£evæ Zvæ¿£evæ
Call Now For
Hustler Turf
Pre-Season Pricing
And Financing Options.
320-329-3469
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 31 - AG SCENE
-Encirca (Variable Rate Prescriptions, Nitrogen modeling)
-Pioneer Brand Products (Corn, Soybeans, and Alfalfa)
- Soil/Grid Sampling + Fertilizer VR maps
-Grass Seeds, Pasture Mixes, Deer Plot, Wheat, Oats
Matt Buckentin
(320) 247-3187
Chris Buckentin
(320) 296-6260
-ProBulk Site with Bulk Delivery/Custom Seed Treatment
-Field Planning and Agronomy support
Follow us on twitter- @buckentinseeds
www.buckentinseeds.com
HomeBuilder 101
7uesday, March 8th, 2016
6:30pm P.M.
AgStar
l7l Last lth Street, lencoe
Cnll 8õõ-577-1831
re regisrer reJnyl
Ag5rnr.cem
· Better stain protection
· Better durabiIity
· Better softness
· Better for the environment.
Environmentally Smart Carpet
Environmentally Smart Carpet
· Better stain protection
· Better durabiIity
· Better softness
· Better for the environment.
BERGMANN’S
CELEBRATING 38 YEARS OF SERVICE!
INTERIORS
“The Decorating Store At YOUR Door!”
Call 320-864-6754
for your FREE IN-HOME
appointment.
• Floor Coverings • Window Treatments
18 Months
Same as Cash!
*
In Stock
for Quick Install
Save up to 33%
off our normal everyday
low prices!
Visit BergmannInteriors.com
*Some restrictions & minimums apply. Credit offers starting March 9.
License #
BC 331123
320-864-4453 • 612-280-6870 • www.schauerconstructioninc.com
I will cut at your place or ours. Give Vir gil a call.
Custom sawing of logs.
We are looking to purchase logs
for processing.
Come see
what
I saw...
Schauer & Sons
Construction
• Concrete & Masonry
• Pole Barns • Reclads
• New Constructions
• Houses • Remodeling
• Light Commercial
SILVER LAKE, MN
320-327-3170
AG SCENE - 32 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
We oller o lull line ol Form Ag Produc|s & 5ervicesI
Iurms, Iurm Operutions
OIIvIu ¸zo-¸z¸-16qq · RenvIIIe ¸zo-¸zq-8¸o1 · GrunILe ¡uIIs ¸zo-¸6q-q¸;¸
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 33 - AG SCENE
By Dick Hagcn
Thc Land Staff Writcr
It ooesn`t matter which agricultural
meeting you atteno this winter, the larm
income lorecast is looking clouoy. Nor
will the marketing gurus who closely lol-
low income prospects lor larmers make
any preoictions on when a turnarouno
might happen, barring a major weather
oisturbance, nothing encouraging in the
near term they say.
At the Willmar, Minn., Linoer Iarm
Network 201o Ag Outlook Meeting,
Cory Bratlano, chiel grain strategist lor
Kluis Commooities in Wayzata, Minn.,
shareo market insight. Bratlano is still
actively involveo in his lamily larm near
Willow Lake, S.D.
Commooity prices in general will re-
main unoer pressure. I think we`re look-
ing at a consolioation phase lor the time
being,¨ he saio. Biggest lactor going
lorwaro I think will be our U.S. oollar
inoex which is being inllateo slightly by
the rest ol the worlo economies which
are just llat out struggling.¨
Bratlano saio other countries are in-
vesting in the Uniteo States which in-
llates our oollar. That stronger U.S.
oollar is making us uncompetitive in
worlo markets. In aooition, he noteo that
we have buroensome supplies lrom back-
to-back years ol recoro proouction.
The pipeline is lull. Exports ol our
agricultural prooucts are oown,¨ Brat-
lano saio.
Going lorwaro, I think weather will
have to be an issue. I`m talking severe
weather that jeoparoizes either the
South American crop or the North
American crop belore we see an upwaro
treno in these markets.¨
In 201¯, corn proouction at 1.!3 bil-
lion bushels was ! percent more than the
previous state recoros set in 2012. Min-
nesota larmers averageo 188 bushels per
acre, 11 bushels above the previous
recoro set in 2010. Soybean proouction
was 378 million bushels, up 2¯ percent
lrom 201!. Yielos averageo ¯0 bu.´acre,
the highest ever ano live bushels more
than the previous recoro set in 2010.
This recoro proouction across the
Miowest prompteo Michael Swanson,
Wells Iargo chiel agricultural economist
to report, Currently, the 201o Chicago
Mercantile Exchange lutures oon`t oller
any reliel lor prooucers who require
higher prices to cash llow.¨
But this glut on pricing may have an
optimistic ring. Bratlano preoicts that
market lows are alreaoy in ano a year or
so ol consolioation ol numbers is aheao
lor the inoustry.
Iorwaro pricing contracts aren`t hap-
pening yet in this new marketing year.
With prices being squeezeo oownwaro
lor several months now, larmers have
turneo gun-shy ol contracts.
But get a little rally this spring ano I
think guys will be more apt to get into
some lorwaro pricing. We know we can
proouce these bushels,¨ he saio. Fro-
ouctivity is no longer an issue because
the genetics larmers are working with
these oays are so phenomenal.¨
Bratlano lives ano aovises Kluis pri-
vate clients through his business Frairie
Ag Marketing in Willow Lake, S.D.
It is amazing the yielos we now get
in our area. 170-bushel, 180-bushel corn
is almost the norm these oays.¨
With little or no prolit penciling out
lor 201o, some ol the marginal grouno
may be going back to the Conservation
Reserve Frogram, saio Bratlano.
Lots ol those contracts expireo ano
haven`t been reneweo because cash rents
got so strong. But that`s changing. Cash
rents have come oown somewhat but
there neeos to be a bigger aojustment,¨
he saio. Sure, lanoowners hate to see
some ol their income oisappear. But il
lower rental rates oon`t happen, we`ll be
seeing tenants getting squeezeo out ano
then lano owners will be lacing the real-
ity ol new tenants constantly.¨
Bratlano saio operating loans are get-
ting tight with lots ol nervous bankers in
the ag lenoing business.
Ior us, this squeeze becomes a busi-
ness plus. In years ol low prices ano tight
margins, especially when they sink below
break-even on cost ol proouction, grow-
ers come to us seeking assistance,¨ he
saio.
So why the boost lor commooity bro-
kers in tough times?
They neeo all the help they can get,¨
saio Bratlano. Anybooy can sell So ano
S7 corn, S10 ano S12 beans, but when
the crunch is on, it becomes such an
emotionally oillicult time to make the
sale. Our service is sitting oown with our
customers ano in oetail reviewing their
larming buogets, then working with
them to oo a marketing plan. We are in-
cremental sellers, generally no more
than 10 percent ol your total crop at any
one time.
But we also have a history rich in
charts thanks to Al Kluis, an acknowl-
eogeo expert on reaoing ano interpret-
ing what charts are telling us. Ior
example, soybean markets teno to move
in 39-month cycles. We`re close to the
bottom right now baseo on chart his-
tory.¨
WcATHcniNc
THc STonms
SiNcc 1B93.
More than four generations of farmers have trusted Farmers Mutual Hail.
That`s just one reason we`re the respected leader in the industry.
Want more reasons? Call your local Farmers Mutual Hail agent.
Keith L. Scott Agencg
KeILI ScoLL
1¸o S. 8LI SL · BIrd ¡sIund, MN ¸¸¸1o
¿±o-¿6g-¿qoo · 1-¿±o-g,q-ogg±
L00K F0R 1RE CI0UD
ÏARMERS MU1UAI hAII ÍNSURANCE L0MPANY
Robert P. Saunders, CPA, CFP
Dawn M. Mertens, RAP
Laurie A. Schmitz, CPA
Jüo ó. MutH óÍt££Í * bttu IStuHu, MN oodJU
Fh0H£. (d2U) d6o - ü62U
W£DStÍ£. WWW.SmS£þu]ttm.£0m
• We provide you with all your farm
& home insurance needs
• Serving 13 counties for 120 years
• 20 agencies in a 50 mile radius
Call for an
Agency
Near You!
Judy Schroeder (Manager) • Norma Monson (Office Assistant)
Flora Mutual Ins. Co.
PO Box 368
Danube, MN 56230
888-826-2670
or 320-826-2374
Strong U.S. oollar makes U.S.
gralns a tougb sell
Dollar
Turn to page
Dollar
Turn to page 35
AG SCENE - 34 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
30-70
%
Off
Storewide!
*Where our
Product, Price
and People make
the difference!
BEDROOM SETS DINING SETS
WISE ROOMS: CHOOSE YOUR PACKAGE ‘WISELY’
Door County
Furniture, Ohio
A
l
l
A
m
i s h
D
i n
i n
g
&
B
e d
r
o o m
S
e t s
5
0
%
O
f
f
WISE FURNITURE CO.
SALE
STARTS
NOW!
106 Ferry St.
LeSueur, MN 56058
507-665-2238
Hours: M-F 8-5:30; Th. 8-7; Sa. 9-4;
Su. Closed – By Appointment –
Financing
Available!
*12 mos.,
no interest,
see store for details.
Over
150
Recliners
In Stock!
Name
Brands:
Englander
Serta
Over 30
Models on
Display!
VISIT OUR SLEEP CENTER!
SEE OUR NEW HOME APPLIANCE CENTER!
FLOORING CLOCKS
3
great
recliner styles
+
fabrics 30
Choose from 3 great recliner
styles available in over 30 select
fabrics at no additional charge.
Jasper
Gabe
Available upgrades
on all 3 recliners:
See store
for details.
$
399
each
YOUR
CHOICE
RECLINERS
Conner
new
$$
each
399
99
new
r 3 ll a n o
lable u ai v AAv
for details.
See store
: liners c e r
s e d a r g p lable u
r ne
3
great
reclining sofas
+
fabrics 50
PINNACLE RECLINING SOFA
ASHER RECLINING SOFA
LANCER RECLINING SOFA
$
999
each
YOUR
CHOICE
RECLINING SOFASS
See store
for details.
Available
upgrades:
Available
upgrades:
See store
for details.
Available
upgrades:
See store
for details.
$$
9
99 9 9
each
LANCER RECLINING SOF
AAv
s e d ra pg u
vailable
:
s e d ra pg u :
See store
for details.
AAvvailable
A ECLINING SOFFA
See store
for details.
A
ll
B
edding
O
n S
ale!
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 35 - AG SCENE
BIRD ISLAND
SOIL SERVICE
· CompIete Line of FertiIizers
DRY - NH3 - NAF Micro
Lime & AppIication
· FuII Line of QuaIity Seed
· SoiI Test to 4 ft
· Count on us this spring
Brad Aaseth, Manager · Bird Island, MN
320-365-3655 · 1-800-369-2812
8
8
00
00
F
F
0N0f
0N0f
8
8
0¢8lf, ll0
0¢8lf, ll0
David Dunsmore - Belview · 320-894-7843
• Complete Tractor, Combine,
& Skid Loader Repair
• 30 Years Experience on IH
& Case IH Equipment
• All Makes and Models
~ Red, Blue or Green
Ðu§tng §ouz Fazm Sozap
Scrap Iron, Tin, Wire, Cars, Trucks, Combines, Tractors
ANY FARM EQUIPMENT
Also...Aluminum Cans, Copper, Brass,
Aluminum, Radiators, Electric Motors,
Batteries
ALMOST EVERYTHING!
N-Ìsou`s SaÌva¿- auJ Towiu¿, Iuc.
30806 360th St.
Redwood Falls, MN
Charles W. Nelson
1-507-641-3061
Monday thru Friday 8-6 • Saturday 8-Noon
Running Late...Just Give a Call!
P
ic
k
U
p
&
C
o
n
ta
in
e
rs
A
v
a
iIa
b
Ie
Wcathcr
Bratlano speculates il La Nina ooes set up this spring, it coulo be a wilo rioe lor
soybeans come August. Soybean proouction has explooeo in South America, he
saio. Currently South America proouces ¯0 percent more soybeans than the Uniteo
States. Ano the export tax on Argentina soybeans has been reouceo lrom 3¯ percent
to 30 percent, soy meal ano soy oil export taxes reouceo lrom 32 percent to 27 per-
cent with the incentive ol a ¯ percent reouction per year lor the herealter. Argentina
is a major competitor, especially to the China market.
Bratlano notes some caution about U.S. weather lorecasts lor this spring. The
weather speaker at the Linoer meeting preoicteo a strong possibility ol a coloer ano
wetter spring in the Miowest.
We`ve been watching weather mooels lor the past 30 oays ano will continue to
stuoy them lor the next o0-90 oays,¨ saio Bratlano. There is a legitimate concern
about La Nina setting up lor this late winter-early spring. The last time we hao a La
Nina ellect was 2012 ano we enoeo up with something like a 123 bushel national
corn yielo. Such a oisruption in 201o woulo inoeeo impact commooity prices
strongly.¨
Non-GMO crops
Organic crops aren`t making an impact on commmooity markets, saio Bratlano.
The market premium is lor real,¨ saio Bratlano, but at this stage organics are
such a small total that commooity pricing isn`t allecteo.¨
Bratlano saio he thinks the Uniteo States neeos to get more aggressive in promot-
ing our corn exports as we`ve alreaoy oone a gooo job with soybean exports.
Il or when this worlo economy starts stabilizing it will be positive lor U.S. agricul-
ture simply because we continue to be the worlo`s number one prooucer, our quality
is the worlo`s best, ano we can oeliver to wherever the prooucts are neeoeo,¨ saio
Bratlano.
That`s happening with U.S. soybeans. Ioreign countries trying to better leeo their
people have learneo that with soybeans they can meet the protein neeos ol their peo-
ple with a thiro as many bushels.¨
He acknowleoges the non-GMO issue will continue to prevent U.S. exports into
several countries. But he also recognizes the tremenoous impact ol tooay`s genetics
on proouctivity.
Il we were still struggling with 120-130 bushel yielos I coulon`t imagine what
grain prices woulo be right now. Ano how little grain we woulo have to leeo into the
worlo looo chain,¨ saio Bratlano.
Follow Cory Brntlnnd on Twittor ¡thogrninguy.
Dick Hagcn is a staff vritcr for Thc Land, a farn and faniIy nagazinc ovncd hy
Thc Frcc Prcss Mcdia. This articIc vas originaIIy puhIishcd in Thc Land jan. 29 and
Fch. 5. Visit vvv.ThcLandOnIinc.con for norc Minncsota and northcrn Iova ag
ncvs.
Pboto by D|ck Hagen
Cory 8ratlano
Dollar: c|ao¿es |o co··eoc¸ va|oe a¦¦ect t·aoe
Contlnueo trom page
Dollar: Changes in currency value affect trade
Continued from page 33
AG SCENE - 36 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
Olivia
KGLB
Glencoe
HEAR LYNN KETELSEN &
LINDA BREKKE EVERY WEEKDAY ON
KOLV
TALKING TO AGRICULTURE’S MOVERS & SHAKERS
www.LinderFarmNetwork.com
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 37 - AG SCENE
Spring Tree & Shrub Auction
by Fahey Sales Agency, Inc.
Vay 21sl · o|dd|rg oeg|rs al 9:30 AV
10ô03 ßoone Road · P|ato, HN · (320} 238-2572
Haps and more |nfo at kahnkefarm.com
OPEN 8ATURDAY8: May-Nov. º 8AM-3PM
0uant|ty 0|scounts on 8pruce Trees
8ee our rates on the "8PE6|AL8" page
at kahnkefarm.com
2735 12
TH
ST., GLENCOE
On-Site Repairs Available
QUALITY AND EXPERIENCE
THAT YOU CAN TRUST
Gold Country ~ LG ~ MPS
Mycogen ~ Stine
Corn ~ Soybeans ~ Oats ~ Wheat ~ Barley
Alfalfa ~ Forage/Pasture Mixes ~ Lawn Seed
Thalmann Seeds Inc.
Plato, MN • (320) 238-2185
Grow With Us!
QUALITY AND EXPERIENCE
THAT YOU CAN TRUST
AG SCENE - 38 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 39 - AG SCENE
(320) 587-2612
Clocktower Ofce Plaza
720 Century Ave. SW, Suite 109, Hutchinson, MN
Now is the time to protect your crop input cost!
February Meetngs Coming Soon...RSVP Today!
Duane Jindra Crop Insurance Agency has been commited to serving you with honest, reliable and trusted service for over 30 years.
New strategies and additonal price optons with higher revenue available in 2016.
If you want a company you can count on to be there at claim tme with excellent service, let Duane Jindra Crop Insurance Agency
help you choose the right policy that gives you the protecton and peace-of-mind that you deserve.
Call Duane Today!
By Ryan Cox, Ph.D.,
Extension Meats Specialist,
University of Minnesota Beef Team
During these holiday months many
Americans will spend quality time with
family enjoying a variety of meals and
hopefully also enjoying the satisfying
flavor that beef provides.
It is also very important to remem-
ber the numerous benefits that beef
provides to human nutrition. As a nu-
trient dense red meat, beef contains a
number of nutrients that are critical to
the development and maintenance of
key functions in the human body.
In fact, several of these nutrients are
not found in any other type of food in
the abundance and correct proportion
that human physiology demands.
Nutritionists argue that the most
common nutritional deficiency on the
planet is iron deficiency. It is estimated
that 2/3 to 3/4 of the human popula-
tion is deficient in iron to some extent.
Beef is a very good source of iron,
with perhaps the highest concentration
of iron than any other commonly con-
sumed meat. Additionally, the iron in
beef is more biologically available than
iron from other sources. Since this iron
is already in the heme form needed by
mammals, upwards of 1/4 of the iron
in beef is absorbed by the human
body, as opposed to 1-2 percent from
non-heme iron sources, such as green
vegetables.
Another common human nutritional
deficiency is zinc, with an estimated
1/4 of the population deficient. Foods
that are rich in zinc are also typically
rich in iron. Thus, beef is a very good
source of zinc, with approximately 25
percent absorbed by the human body.
Moreover, beef provides a notable
amount of selenium to the diet, a nu-
trient critical to the human antioxidant
defense system.
Vitamin B12 is essential to develop-
ment and can only be found in animal
derived foods such as beef. Additional-
ly, vitamin B6 is necessary for the ab-
sorption of amino acids, the building
blocks of proteins.
Beef is a good source of both of these
B vitamins. Additionally regarding
amino acids, red meats such as beef
are a dense source of these protein pre-
cursors, and are in the same propor-
tion needed by humans. Access to high
quality protein sources such as beef al-
lows for the proper development of the
major structure and functional systems
in the human body.
Fat consumption has a negative stig-
ma, but a closer evaluation indicates
that properly proportioned fat con-
sumption plays a very important role
in the maintenance of human physiol-
ogy and development.
There has been a great deal of re-
cent interest in the beneficial effects of
the very long chain polyunsaturated
acids, in particular eicosapentaenoic
acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid
(DHA), and conjugated linoleic acid
(CLA). Anti-atherogenic, anti-throm-
botic and anti-inflammatory effects
have been noted with consumption of
these specific nutrients.
Additionally, there is some evidence
that increased maternal polyunsaturat-
ed fatty acid intake during pregnancy
may produce beneficial effects.
Impact on human health is among
the primary concerns of the consumer
when considering consumption of beef
and other red meat products. Lean
beef not only provides a positive eating
experience, it is a very nutrient dense
food with many benefits to human
health.
With high concentrations of nutri-
ents such as biologically available iron
and vitamins needed for proper me-
tabolism, beef also contains a noted
amount of healthy fats that are impor-
tant to human functions.
Visit the University of Minnesota
Beef Extension page at www.exten-
sion.umn.edu/beef or www.exten-
sion.umn.edu/meatscience for further
questions regarding beef or meat sci-
ence.
The benefits of beef in the human diet
AG SCENE - 40 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
M/d ·5/a/e Pa/a//aq
!||| îîkîî1|î • ¡lî·îlî·îî1î
|lî|Iî|î î lIî!î|î. |î|| |îîl¥kî|.
• Farm & Commercial Buildings
• Wood or Metal
• Exterior Painting
We aIso do residentiaI & interior painting
UID ÏARM ßUIIDINGS NEED
A FACEIIF1!
GIve us a eaII!
We speeIaIIze In tarm and
eommereIaI buIIdIngs!
Wc can handlc all ol your hcatlng and plumblng nccds!
llt0ßI00 è 60ß000 h0thäßltäI è FI0N0lßj t0ßIlätI0lI
:ii I Iark Avc. Icnvlllc - ¸:u-¸:ç-¸66¸
GcothcrmaI Hcating and CooIing Systcm
sc% FcdcraI Ta× Crcdits through ecic!
Prouo to |e a serv|ce to our |oca| commuo|tv!
0ßll. JZ0·âZJ·14â8 0ßll. JZ0·âZJ·14â8
Don 5mith Don 5mith
(32û) 583-3412 (32û) 583-3412
Creq 5eidI Creq 5eidI
(32û) 492-6274 (32û) 492-6274
f0f 8ll ¶00f f0f 8ll ¶00f
0l00lfl08l ß0008II 0l00lfl08l ß0008II
6000 0l0 f880l0ß $0f9l00I 6000 0l0 f880l0ß $0f9l00I
80M0 ª f8fM 80M0 ª f8fM
ª lß008lfl8l 8ß0 00MM0f0l8l ª lß008lfl8l 8ß0 00MM0f0l8l
T0Ht bHttutH§ óHþþty H£uuqHutÍ£tS!
Residential
Commercial · Poultry
Swine · Dairy
Post Frame Structures
We are here to help you...
Mark Ruplinger, Adam Ruplinger,
Paul Mattson & Adrian McLoyd
Danube, MN - 320-826-2341 · 888-550-2341 - dlumber@tds.net
Larkin Tree Care &
Landscapi ng, Inc.
·Tree & Shrub
Trimming &
Removal
·Stump Grinding
·Landscape
·Design/Installation
·Pavers, Retaining
Walls
Insured - Licensed
Doug Larkin Christa Larkin
Arborist Designer
Home: (320} 329-3855
Renville, Mn
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 41 - AG SCENE
By Dick Hagcn
Thc Land Staff Writcr
An interview with John Baize, veteran
worlo traveler ano observer ol worlo agri-
culture, yielos a book-loao ol inlormation
ano insight. Baize, presioent ol John C.
Baize ano Associates, ollers vision, view-
points ano canoor. A Q8A lormat works
well.
The Lano intervieweo Baize at the Lin-
oer Iarm Network 201o Ag Outlook
Meeting on Jan. 12 in Willmar, Minn.
Baize was a leatureo speaker at all ol the
Linoer meetings.
Q: In view ol China`s continuing heao-
line presence, what`s going on in China
ano how might it impact U.S. agriculture?
Baizc: Their current economic crash
seemeo inevitable. You can`t push lor a 10
percent yearly growth rate without suller-
ing consequences. With China it`s too
much oebt because they never stop builo-
ing whether it`s more lactories, more hous-
ing, more railroaos ano highways more
ol everything. Because ol inllation, the
value ol their currency keeps going up.
Also, their wage rates kept increasing so
their costs ol proouction were going up.
All ol that has to come to a heao ano
that`s what`s happening. What you really
have is a correction, sometimes just a slow-
oown ano sometimes a recession. I think
the Chinese economy might be heaoing
into a recession with this one.
They now want to get their currency
oevalueo so their exports are more com-
petitive ano imports are less competitive.
Yes, it`s oisrupting the export ol U.S. ag
prooucts into China. They always are
looking lor the cheapest provioer, even
more so now. Our share ol the Chinese
soybean market oecreaseo somewhat this
past year. Their total imports went up by 8
million tons with most ol that coming
lrom Brazil. But even so, over o0 percent
ol our total soybean exports are still going
to China. Soybean imports continue strong
because proteins lor their livestock ano
their people are such a high priority.
Q: Any likelihooo ol a revolt within the
ranks ol their people?
Baizc: Most ol the people who are not
wealthy oon`t have the ability to change
things because ol the oppressive nature ol
their totalitarian government. I`ve olten
saio that the leaoers ol China woulo preler
to leave ollice vertically rather than hori-
zontally. So they`re always ooing some-
thing that woulo appear to be satislying
the wishes ol the people, especially that ex-
panoing mioole class. The wealthy people,
ano there are many very wealthy people in
China, have to a large extent alreaoy
louno a way to oeal with these extremes.
Many have homes outsioe China ano will
leave il conoitions become too challenging.
Alreaoy there is a tremenoous population
ol wealthy Chinese living in Southeast
Asia, also in the Uniteo States. Il push
comes to shove, they`ll leave their home-
lano¦
Q: In view ol this economic squeeze is
their population leveling oll, even oeclin-
ing?
Baizc: It`s leveling oll. The birth rate is
now slower than the oeath rate. They`ve
320-329-3830
Jim SuIIivan
82535 County Road 6
RenviIIe, MN 56284
Fax: 320-329-3210
Email:
sullivanselectric@yahoo.com
For all your Electrical needs!
• • •
OIivia · New UIm · FaribauIt · New Hope
We're dedicated to
meeting your farming
business needs.
From appraisals to farm management to real
estate transactions - count on the professionals
at Upper Midwest Management to help you make
sound decisions.
Give us a call at 320-523-1951 or visit
www.ummc.co to learn more today.
www.ummc.co
8alze
Turn to page
[obn 8alze sees lots ot cballenges arouno worlo
? & ?
T 4 l
MONDAY - WEDNESDAY: 9AM-6PM
THURSDAY: 9AM-8PM | FRIDAY: 9AM-6PM
SATURDAY: 9AM-4PM | SUNDAY: CLOSED
www.oliviachryslercenter.com
1407 West Lincoln Ave. | Olivia, MN
320.523.2170 | 800.839.5337
OIivia ChrysIer Center has a smaII suppIy of remaining 2015 new Ram trucks and we have new 2016 Rams trucks arriving daiIy.
Check out aII of our great speciaI prices; with additionaI discounts avaiIabIe to farmers and business owners
MSRP: $40,730
Rebates: $3,000
OCC Savings: $4,735
Your Price: $32,995
Baize
Turn to page 43
AG SCENE - 42 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
Serving the Agriculture
and Farm Community!
1400 W. 13th Street, Glencoe, MN 55336
www.miller-mfg.com
Call Today! 651-982-5100
Miller Manufacturing is proud to be a
growing company in McLeod County.
In fact, we recently added over 96,000
square feet to our Glencoe warehouse.
Want to become a member of our team?
Now hiring Full and P/T Professional and Production Careers.
iller Ma M
oud r turing is p c nufa
o be a t
651-982-5100 y! a od TTo all C
F ing r i h w o N
o tto ant WWa
eet f e r squa
e w , t c In fa
c wing o r g
iller Manufa M
651-982-5100
f .miller-m w ww
S . 13th W 1400
on i t c odu r P and l a on i ess ffe o r P T / d P n a ull F
t er of our b ome a mem c e b
ehous r a w oe c o our Glen t eet
er 96,000 v o tly added n e c e r e
C eod L y in Mc n ompa c
oud r turing is p c iller Manufa
om c . g
, MN 55336 e o c , Glen t ee r t S
. s eer r a C on
eam? team?
. e ehous
er 96,000
. y t n ou C
o be a t
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 43 - AG SCENE
oecioeo you can now have two chiloren in-
steao ol just one. But il you only have two
that isn`t enough because early oeaths, an
accelerating olo age population, ano a
growing economy that neeos more workers
still leaves China short ol what it now
neeos. Thanks to better health care, lile ex-
pectancy even in China, is going up.
But that only works lor awhile. There`s a
general unoerstanoing that il the birth rate
orops below 1.¯ births per couple, you`re
lalling behino. Frocreation has to keep up
with what the economy is neeoing or
you`re going backwaros.
You shareo some interesting oata on
Argentina. Thanks to a new presioent who
eliminateo or greatly reouceo export taxes
on agricultural prooucts, you suggest Ar-
gentina will now expano agricultural pro-
ouction.
Their new government leaoer
eliminateo export taxes on wheat, corn,
beel ano sunllower seeo which previously
were in the 23 to 32 percent range. Flus
they`ve cut the export tax on soybeans
lrom 3¯ percent to 30 percent. The net el-
lect is increaseo income opportunity lor
Argentina larmers. What`s likely is a prob-
able ooubling ol corn ano wheat plantings,
maybe tripling sunllower plantings ano
perhaps a cutback in soybeans lor the short
term. That`s because thanks to a oevalua-
tion ol their currency, about ¯00 million
bushels ol soybeans sitting in storage be-
cause growers coulon`t alloro the export
tax are now being oumpeo on the market.
You mentioneo signilicant improve-
ment in river travel lor Brazil`s crops.
They can now transport a thou-
sano miles upriver lrom their ocean ports.
They`ve also improveo channels on certain
rivers so they can oo barge trallic another
o00 miles inlano. These all llow into the
Amazon. So lor example, at Sante Rim
where Cargill has a major lacility, they now
have an inlano port lacility where the river
is 12 miles wioe I`m tolo ano over 200 leet
oeep. Yet you are 800 miles lrom the
ocean. It woulo be much like taking an
ocean-going vessel up the Mississippi to
Minneapolis.
Do you see the political climate in
America in lor a major overhaul alter the
November elections.
We`re going to be seeing a ram-
bunctious year in politics. That`s alreaoy
unoerway. Il lor no other reason than Mr.
Trump is going to get certain issues ois-
cusseo that otherwise woulon`t have been
oiscusseo. He is the absolute challenge to
political correctness in the American scene.
He`s maoe immigration an issue, he`s
maoe Islamic migration a major concern,
he`s maoe everyone aware ol the neeo lor
a stronger, bigger wall across our southern
boroer with Mexico. He`s ruoe, cruoe ano
likeo¦ You have to aomire how he hanoles
the meoia. He`s quick ano clever at manip-
ulating the meoia into covering him be-
cause they think he`s rioiculous ano that
has simply gotten him even more coverage.
The ooos are the Republicans are going
to win this election because we have a his-
tory in this country ol going eight years
belore its time lor a change in leaoership
lrom one party to another party.
Shoulo that happen, will our general
population continue to be lrustrateo with
the oivision within the ranks ol Congress?
Frobably not. You will just have
a oillerent set ol people upset with Con-
gress.
The Democrats right now are upset be-
cause the Republicans are in control, but
WE’VE GOT NUMBERS OTHER SOYBEAN
COMPANIES HOPE YOU NEVER HEAR ABOUT.
5N182 and 5N207
Local Dealers: Olivia - Wertish Brothers
Renville - Dale Filzen
Co-op Country Farmers Elevator
Mycogen is a brand name. Numbers identify hybrids
®
, ¹Trademarks, registered or applied for by Mycogen Corporation.
LIKE
Farm Loans Business Loans
1115 W. Lincoln Ave., Olivia, MN · 320-523-2040 · www.htbmn.com
-Llnes of CredlL
-Worklng CaplLal
-8eal LsLaLe
-Machlnery &
LqulpmenL
Ieremy Irank
NMLS #417S44
8|| Schm|tz
NMLS #11S91S3
Dan Ldwards
NMLS #1101813
Olivia Branch
8alze: C|ao¿es |o .o·|o ¬a·'et Contlnueo trom page
8alze
Turn to page
Baize: Changes in world market Continued from page 41
Baize
Turn to page 45
AG SCENE - 44 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
· 0|att £fch|0g 8 |ater £0grav|0g
· 0raþh|ct 8 Accettor|et
· I0|| 0þho|tfery 8hoþ
· 8|g0t 8 |effer|0g
· 0o|l 0arf 8 0o|l
0arf Accettor|et
-Heers-
M-I - 8 - 5:J0
8ÁI - 8 - heen
J
2
0
-
8
2
5
-
2
5
J
5
P
z
n
e
|
c
,
M
h
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 45 - AG SCENE
Baize: Technology to shape the future Continued from page 43
AG SCENE - 46 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
716 E. 10
th
St., P.O. Box 188, Glencoe, MN 55336
320-864-5518 • trishak@glencoenews.com
816 E. Lincoln Ave. Olivia, MN 56277
320-523-2032 • oproduction@rencopub.com
PHOTO CLASSIFIED
p
l
u
s
Sell your stuff in the classifieds!
10
PUBLICATIONS
5 WEEKS
f
o
r
15 words
or less for
$
50
(
$
50¢ each additional word.
$
45 without a photo.)
McLeod County
Chronicle
Glencoe Advertiser
AGRICULTURE • AUTOMOTIVE • EMPLOYMENT • FOR SALE
LIVESTOCK & PETS • REAL ESTATE • RENTAL • SERVICES
Arlington
Enterprise
Sibley Shopper
The Galaxy
Renville County
Shopper
Western Peach
Renville County
Register
www.Glencoe
News.com
www.Arlington
MNnews.com

o
r

FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 47 - AG SCENE
- Irlll ^cw Wclls
- Gcothcrmal Irllllng
- Iumps Salcs & Scrvlcc
- Watcrllnc Installatlon
- Òld Watcr Systcm !pdatcs
- Watcr Sampllng
- Ircssurc Jank Salcs & Installatlon
- Wcll Scallng
- Irrlgatlon Wclls
7 Day Service
Since 1956
ERVIN WELL COMPANY
1312 West DePue Ave. • Olivia, MN
320-523-1621
1-800-582-6133 (toll free)
www.ervinwellmn.com
DEVOTED TO YOUR SUCCESS
www.unitedfcs.com •
AG
YOUR
EXPERTS
oln A
S
OFFICE OLIVIA
S T EXPER
OUR Y
G A
inancing with no Balloon P e F t eal Esta • R
ecializing in: Sp
O Y T TED O V DE
ts ymen a inancing with no Balloon P
ecializing in:
CESS SUC OUR O Y
ee: 800-324-5751 r oll F TTo
hone: 715-842-4631 P
Olivia, MN 5627
e v oln A . Linc W 1815
r P ax • T Ta
op I r • Hail & C
dkeeping S or ec • R
oans with A al Home L • Rur
ock & M est , Liv ting a • Oper
edf .unit w w w
vider and Emplo o rr , P enderr, y L tunitty or pp al Op qu E
tion a epar r
e anc nsur op I
es vic er dkeeping S
eage cr oans with A
oans y L achiner ock & M
om • .c cs edf
. NMLS #533465 er r. yye vider and Emplo
Hlgber populatlons not answer to blgber ylelos
By Dick Hagcn
ARLINGTON Discussing high yielo
corn systems, Jell Coulter, University ol
Minnesota Extension corn agronomist
showeo his auoience surprising yielo oata
comparing three planting rates 30,000,
3o,000 ano !2,000 at research centers in
Waseca, Lamberton ano Rochester. The
3o,000 rate was the yielo champ¨ in
seven ol the nine comparisons.
There was also no yielo increase with
more than 30,000 seeos per acre in live ol
the 12 environments. Stuoies were oone in
2012, 2013, 201!, ano 201¯ at all three lo-
cations.
Coulter presenteo his linoings at the
201o Winter Crops Days lrom the Univer-
sity ol Minnesota Southern Research ano
Outreach Center ano the U ol M Exten-
sion on Jan. 1!, in Arlington.
Coulter also showeo comparisons on
two rates ol nitrogen applications, 1¯¯
pounos per acre vs. 200 pounos per acre
on 3o,000 ano !2,000 populations. At
Waseca, the 1¯¯ pouno rate at 32,000 pop-
ulation showeo a better net return three ol
the lour years. At Lamberton, net return
per acre at !2,000 population was a mixeo
bag, two years lavoreo the 1¯¯ pouno rate,
two years showeo the 200 pouno rate
slightly better. At Rochester, net returns
per acre lavoreo the 1¯¯ pouno N applica-
tion three ol the lour years.
We`re seeing little value in going to the
!2K rate ano the higher 200 pouno nitro-
gen application. Looking at these stuoies at
these three oillerent locations, each with
oillerent soils, it`s probably sale to say that
weather in any given location, every year is
still the key oriver in yielos,¨ saio Coulter.
Yielos over this three-year stuoy rangeo
lrom 220 bushels per acre ano better at all
three locations in 201¯ with Lamberton
oata the highest, but lows in the 1o0
bu.´acre category in 2013, also at Lamber-
ton. Coulter`s take home points were:
· Increases in corn yielo ano net return
are limiteo in lrequency ano magnituoe
with above-normal planting rates ano uses
ol other inputs,
· Weather can have a much larger im-
pact on yielo than agronomic inputs ano it
greatly inlluences optimum N manage-
ment,
· Have a Flan B ano Flan C in case the
weather causes challenges.
Coulter cautioneo that because ol stag-
nant worlo markets, too much worlo pro-
ouction ano the strong U.S. oollar, it looks
like a tough year aheao lor prolitable crop
proouction. In view ol this challenging
outlook, he suggesteo prooucers ano crop
consultants must also be economists with
strict attention to oetails.
Coulter recommenoeo controlling costs
without impacting yielo ano conoucting
simple on-larm tests to evaluate your in-
puts. He aoviseo being timely in planting,
lertilizer application, pest control ano har-
vesting. Coulter also reminoeo prooucers
not to overlook the basics ol crop rotation,
hybrio selection, stano establishment ano
weeo control.
Coulter pointeo out that in 201¯ Min-
nesota-National Corn Growers Association
Corn Yielo trials 10 ol the 1¯ winners
were in southeast Minnesota, three were in
south central Minnesota. Ano the winning
maturity in each was 103-10¯ oays.
Warmer temperatures, more lavorable
soil types ano better rainlall oistribution
were contributing lactors he inoicateo. But
a !0-bushel spreao between the top ano
bottom yielos suggesteo hybrio selection is
critical.
Nltrogen
U ol M Extension researcher Jell
Vetsch oiscusseo variable rates ol nitrogen
applications lor corn. Due to growing con-
cerns about leaching potentials ol lall ap-
plications ol anhyorous ammonia, Vetsch,
Extension eoucators Brao Carlson ano
Ryan Miller testeo N plus preplant ano
sioeoress treatments, applieo in combina-
tion in lall ano spring.
There is consioerable interest in using
sioeoress N to line tune current N recom-
menoations. The typical practice is apply-
ing o0-7¯ percent ol N prior to planting
ano then sioeoress remaining N,¨ Vetsch
saio.
In these plots, sioeoress N was applieo
as urea plus NBFT at Vo-8 growth stage.
NBFT reouces the risk ol ammonia loss.
They also stuoieo the ellects ol time ol N
application ano Dow Agro Sciences In-
stinct nitrogen stabilizer on corn proouc-
tion ano nitrate losses lrom tile orainage.
Vetsch shareo this summary:
· A split application ol N ,lixeo or vari-
able, increaseo corn yielos at three ol lour
sites when compareo to a single preplant
rate,
· Only one ol three sites showeo a yielo
increase large enough to give a return on
investment,
· Yielos with lall application ol urea
were much less than spring urea in one ol
lour years, similar in two ol lour years
,2012 ano 201!, ano slightly greater in
only one year ,201¯ with an eight bushel
aovantage,,
· Aooing Instinct to lall-applieo urea in-
creaseo yielo ano reouceo NO3 concentra-
tion ano loss in tile orainage water only in
2013,
· Iall-applieo urea hao 38 percent
greater NO3 loss in tile orainage water
than oio spring applieo urea, when aver-
ageo across 2013-201¯.
Vetsch noteo, Climatic conoitions can
ano oo greatly orive results.¨
Dick Hagcn is a staff vritcr for Thc
Land, a farn and faniIy nagazinc
ovncd hy Thc Frcc Prcss Mcdia. This ar-
ticIc vas originaIIy puhIishcd in Thc
Land jan. 29 and Fch. 5. Visit vvv.Thc-
LandOnIinc.con for norc Minncsota
and northcrn Iova ag ncvs.
AG SCENE - 48 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
We’re with you when it comes to maximizing your
profit. That’s why you can rely on the unique
additive package in Cenex® Ruby Fieldmaster®
premium diesel fuel to improve your bottom line
by helping you lower maintenance costs, reduce
downtime and increase fuel economy. Learn
more about our top-of-the-line premium diesel
and get a warranty for up to 10 years or 10,000
hours at cenex.com/rubyfieldmaster.
Whatever color your equipment is,
is guaranteed to save you green.
330 E. 10th St., Glencoe
1-800-848-6753 • 320-864-5561
Tire Service - Glencoe
320-864-6292
Call Glencoe
Co-op for your
spring diesel
needs!
Your Complete
Building Resource
Homes – Garages – Decks – Cabinets
Remodeling – Pole Buildings
We sell quality building materials for all your projects.
1120 DeSoto Ave. N. • Glencoe
320-864-5103 or 800-700-5210
Monday-Friday 7:00 am-5:00 pm
6f0¶ 8 80l0l 0ll0
IJZ0l 48â·JJë8
00ll IJZ0l â10·04ë8
Combining
w/8talk Chopping Heads
Baling {3x3x8}
Disk Ripping
Grain 8wathing
Grain Hauling
8pring Tillage
Planting
Brillion Packer Rental
Manure Pumping
0
l
l
0
f8fM8 0¢0f8ll0ß8
, lß
0
.
20243 County Rd 9, Lester Prairie, MN 55354
Chopping º Filling
Bags, Bunkers, 8ilos
Front & Rear Unload
Trucks Available
Packing Available
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 49 - AG SCENE
BE READY.
SEE US TODAY.
You can’t wait for ideal conditions when it’s time to plant or harvest. At Case IH, we know that
timing is everything. That’s why the new Magnum

Rowtrac

series tractor gives you optimum
power, traction, and control to tackle the most adverse conditions. The combination of wheels
and tracks provides four points of ground contact, reducing compaction and rutting while
increasing fotation and tractive power. Tire options that ft your row width and soil type and an
oscillating rear-track design keep power on the ground, even through the tightest turns. Plus,
the unique four-range CVT maximizes available power and increases mechanical effciency.
Experience a versatile machine that handles like a wheeled
tractor but foats like a track. To learn more, visit your Case IH
dealer or go to caseih.com.
ARNOLD’S OF KIMBALL, INC.
Case IH is a trademark registered in the United States and many other countries,
owned by or licensed to CNH Industrial N.V., its subsidiaries or affiliates. www.caseih.com
Kimball
320-398-3800
Willmar
320-235-4898
Glencoe
320-864-5531
St. Martin
320-548-3285
Mankato
507-387-5515
Alden
507-874-3400
St. Cloud
320-251-2585
320-864-5531 320-235-4898
illmar W
320-398-3800
imball K
507-387-5515
o t a ank M
320-548-3285
tin ar M . t S
320-864-5531
e o lenc G
320-251-2585
loud C .. t S
507-874-3400
lden A
507-387-5515
ies or affilia its subsidiar ., ial N.V o CNH Industr ensed t y or lic wned b o
es and man t ta ed S nit ed in the U er egist k r ademar ase IH is a tr C
om aseih.c .c www . es t ies or affilia
, ies tr oun y other c
By Ryan Crossingham
Farm & Ranch Guide
Managing crop residues are a key as-
pect of any tillage system and, accord-
ing Dr. Dave Franzen, North Dakota
State University Extension soil special-
ist, managing crop residue starts right
at harvest time.
“One of the big mistakes that grow-
ers make is not having a really good
chopper on the back of the combine,”
he said. “A lot of it falls in a 6-8 foot
strip right behind the combine, leaving
heavy residue right behind. Depending
on how the spring is the following
year, that can be pretty tough, no mat-
ter what kind of till you’re going with.”
Franzen said the first thing farmers
have to understand when it comes
residue management is that it starts at
the back of the combine.
“What’s done is done, but you have
to think about the future too,” he said.
“You have to think about that now so
in the summer you can get tooled up
and the next year won’t be quite as big
of a deal.”
For farmers who are going to strip-
till this spring, a practice Franzen be-
lieves some
farmers will
entertain this
upcoming
planting sea-
son, it’s impor-
tant to leave
the stalk stand-
ing.
“When
you’re growing
really high
yields of corn,
the secret is to leave the stalk stand-
ing,” he said. “The last thing you ever
want to do is chop those stalks down.”
The big reasoning behind that is to
keep the residue with the plant and off
the ground.
“If it’s not on the ground, it’s not in-
terfering with any of the planting
process,” he explained.
Another thing farmers need to pay
attention to are “residue managers.”
“That’s what I like to call them,”
Franzen said. “They’re the little
wheels in front of where the shoe goes
and they move residue off to the side
so you can plant right into the soil in-
stead of trying to cut through the
residue. They’re a really nice tool that
can move things out of the way for
you.”
Limiting the number of passes on the
field can also go a long way to manag-
ing residue.
“You don’t want to go across the
field multiple times before you plant,”
he said. “One pass and leaving some
residue out there is just fine. In this re-
gion especially, going as shallow as you
can is important. We’ve had dry
springs, wet springs, all kinds of
springs, but especially in some of the
clay soils, if you get down into the
muck you’re going to have a problem.
Generally in the spring time you’re just
tickling the surface to loosen it up so
you can plant into it.”
The importance of managing
residues is key when it comes to wind
erosion, which as many farmers in the
region are aware, is a big deal.
“It’s a huge deal, not a little deal, but
a huge deal,” said Franzen. “Anytime
we get dry before the crop is up, the
wind can pick up and you’ll lose soil.
Every time you lose soil you lose fertil-
izer value that’s attached to the soil
and you lose a little bit of the natural
productivity that’s in the soil.”
Valuing topsoil hasn’t always been a
priority for farmers as many used to
sell their topsoil to landscaping compa-
nies.
“You want to keep the soil on the
field. The best way to do that is to
keep as much residue on the surface as
possible. It promotes a kind of different
biology in the soil and it recycles the
organic material back into the soil
which can increase organic matter
over time,” Franzen concluded.
Good residue management starts at
back of combine
AG SCENE - 50 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016 - 51 - AG SCENE
AG SCENE - 52 - FEBRUARY 27 & 28, 2016
Don’t face farming uncertainties alone!
Crop insurance through MidCountry Ag Services can help when your crop fails to
thrive. We are available to present multiple options that cover a wide variety of
orops, and guide you to tnd the plan that's right for your business. Rely on us to
help protect your livelihood and to provide peace of mind.
www.MidCountryBank.com/Ag
Growing season will soon be here,
but crop insurance season is now!
MIDCOUNTRY AG SERVICES INCLUDE:
• Lending (RlA- and l3A-approved lenders)
• Insurance
• Risk management
• Estate planning
MIDCOUNTRY AG SERVICES CONTACTS:
Call Scott Lang or David Resch
for more information.
320.234.5490
This document is © 2016 by admin - all rights reserved.